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null

null / nəl/ • adj. 1. having no legal or binding force; invalid: the establishment of a new interim government was declared null and void. 2. having or associated with the value zero. ∎  Math. (of a set or matrix) having no elements, or only zeros as elements. ∎  lacking distinctive qualities; having no positive substance or content: his curiously null life. • n. poetic/lit. a zero. ∎  a dummy letter in a cipher. ∎  Electr. a condition of no signal. ∎  a direction in which no electromagnetic radiation is detected or emitted. • v. [tr.] Electr. combine (a signal) with another in order to create a null; cancel out.

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null

null not valid (n. and void) XVI; insignificant; non-existent XVIII. — (O)F. nul, fem. nulle, or L. nūllus, -a no, none, f. ne (see NO3) + ūllus any, f. ūnus ONE.
So nullify make null XVI. — late L. nullificāre despise. nullification XVIII. nullity XVI. — F. or medL.

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null

null null and void having no legal or binding force.
null hypothesis in a statistical test, the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between specified populations, any observed difference being due to sampling or experimental error.

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Null

NULL

Of no legal validity, force, or effect; nothing. As used in the phrase null and void, refers to something that binds no one or is incapable of giving rise to any rights or duties under any circumstances.

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2,4-D

: see herbicide.

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null

nullannul, cull, dull, gull, hull, lull, mull, null, scull, skull, Solihull, trull, Tull •seagull • multihull • monohull •numbskull • Elul

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