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glycine

glycine (glī´sēn), organic compound, one of the 20 amino acids commonly found in animal proteins. Glycine is the only one of these amino acids that is not optically active, i.e., it does not have d- and l-stereoisomers. It is structurally the simplest of the α-amino acids, having merely a hydrogen atom for a side chain, and is thus very unreactive when incorporated into proteins. Nevertheless, in the free state glycine participates in several important reactions, including the biosynthesis of heme, an important constituent of hemoglobin, and the biosyntheses of serine (another amino acid), purines (constituents of genetic material), and glutathione (a coenzyme). Defects of glycine metabolism are very rare. The amino acid is not essential to the diet since it can be made from other substances in the body. Glycine was the first amino acid to be isolated from a protein, in this case gelatin, and has been found in the halo of a comet, Wild 2.

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glycine

glycine A non‐essential amino acid, chemically the simplest of the amino acids, it is amino‐acetic acid, CH2NH2COOH. It has a sweet taste (70% of the sweetness of sucrose) and is sometimes mixed with saccharin as a sweetening agent. Known at one time as collagen sugar.

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glycine

glycine A sweet-tasting amino acid that, besides being a component of proteins, is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter for fast synapses in the spinal cord of vertebrates. Glycine is also required for opening of NMDA-type glutamate receptors.

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glycine

gly·cine / ˈglīsēn/ • n. Biochem. the simplest naturally occurring amino acid, H2NCH2COOH. It is a constituent of most proteins.

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glycine

glycine The simplest alpha-amino acid, and the only one not to exhibit optical activity.

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Glycine

Glycine (family Leguminosae, subfamily Papilionatae) A genus of 9 species of herbs that are native to Asia and Australia. G. max is the soya bean, which was probably first domesticated in northeastern China and is now widely cultivated in warm temperate regions, mainly for its oil, the oilseed cake used for live-stock feed, a flour made from the beans, and soy source, which is made from the fermented and processed seeds.

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glycine

glycine The simplest alpha amino acid, and the only one not to exhibit optical activity.

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glycine

glycine (gly-seen) n. see amino acid.

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glycine

glycine •gamine • bromine • thiamine •dopamine • amphetamine • histamine •quinine • strychnine • mezzanine •spalpeen • Philippine • lycopene •gangrene • terrene • silkscreen •windscreen • citrine • Dexedrine •putting green • Benzedrine •Irene, polystyrene •widescreen • sight screen •chlorine, chorine, Doreen, Maureen, Noreen, taurine •smokescreen • rood screen •sunscreen • fluorine • helleborine •Gadarene • Hippocrene •glycerine (US glycerin), nitroglycerine (US nitroglycerin) •nectarine • wintergreen • Methedrine •evergreen • wolverine • vaccine •glassine • Essene • Rexine • piscine •epicene • glycine • pyroxene •Palaeocene (US Paleocene) •Pliocene • Miocene • Holocene •damascene • kerosene • Plasticine •Pleistocene

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