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trace1 / trās/ • v. [tr.] 1. find or discover by investigation: police are trying to trace a white van seen in the area. ∎  find or describe the origin or development of: Bob's book traces his flying career with the Marines. ∎  follow or mark the course or position of (something) with one's eye, mind, or finger: through the binoculars, I traced the path I had taken the night before. ∎  take (a particular path or route): a tear traced a lonely path down her cheek. 2. copy (a drawing, map, or design) by drawing over its lines on a superimposed piece of transparent paper. ∎  draw (a pattern or line), esp. with one's finger or toe. ∎  give an outline of: the article traces out some of the connections between education, qualifications, and the labor market. • n. 1. a mark, object, or other indication of the existence or passing of something: remove all traces of the old adhesive | the aircraft disappeared without trace. ∎  a beaten path or small road; a track. ∎  a physical change in the brain presumed to be caused by a process of learning or memory. ∎  a procedure to investigate the source of something, such as the place from which a telephone call was made, or the origin of an error in a computer program. 2. a very small quantity, esp. one too small to be accurately measured: his body contained traces of amphetamines | [as adj.] trace quantities of PCBs. ∎  a slight indication or barely discernible hint of something: just a trace of a smile. 3. a line or pattern displayed by an instrument using a moving pen or a luminous spot on a screen to show the existence or nature of something that is being investigated. ∎  a line that represents the projection of a curve or surface on a plane or the intersection of a curve or surface with a plane. 4. Math. the sum of the elements in the principle diagonal of a square matrix. DERIVATIVES: trace·a·bil·i·ty / ˌtrāsəˈbilitē/ n. trace·a·ble adj. trace·less adj. trace2 • n. each of the two side straps, chains, or ropes by which a horse is attached to a vehicle that it is pulling.

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"trace." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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trace

trace1 †path, course XIII; †series of footprints, track XIV; vestige, mark XVII. — (O)F., f. corr. vb. OF. tracier (mod. tracer) :- Rom. *tractiāre, f. L. tractus TRACT3.
So trace vb. A. proceed in a line or track; B. make marks on a plan, etc. XIV. — OF. Hence tracery †place for tracing XV; intersecting rib-work in a Gothic window XVII.

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trace

trace2 pair of ropes, etc. attached to the collar of a draught animal XIV; each of these XV. ME. trais, first as coll. pl., later as sg. — OF. trais, pl. of trait draught, harness-strap :- L. tractus draught, f. pp. stem of trahere draw.

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trace

trace A recorded data-set for one channel. On a seismic-refraction record made for a 12-channel seismograph, each channel would provide one wave-form which, when viewed with the others, would give a seismic record. See also WIGGLE TRACE.

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Trace

Trace

of hares: hares collectively ; a line or train of people, 1385.

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trace

traceabase, ace, apace, backspace, base, bass, brace, case, chase, dace, efface, embrace, encase, enchase, enlace, face, grace, interlace, interspace, in-your-face, lace, mace, misplace, outface, outpace, pace, place, plaice, race, space, Thrace, trace, upper case •airbase • freebase • wheelbase •database • steeplechase • paperchase •paleface • typeface • whiteface •boldface • coalface • interface •staircase • briefcase • slipcase •packing case • doorcase • showcase •notecase • pillowcase • suitcase •bookcase • nutcase • marketplace •anyplace • everyplace • showplace •shoelace • bootlace • someplace •Lovelace • fireplace • commonplace •workplace • birthplace • tenace •airspace • aerospace • hyperspace •carapace • workspace • ratrace •millrace • Fuentes • rosace

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TRACE

TRACE (treɪs) task reporting and current evaluation
• Aeronautics test equipment for rapid automatic checkout evaluation

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