Marcellinus, Flavius

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MARCELLINUS, FLAVIUS

Fifth-century Roman tribune and notary, friend of St. Augustine; d. Carthage, c. 413. He was a correspondent of St. augustine, having made his acquaintance during the conference of Carthage (411) between the Catholics and Donatists. Marcellinus presided and upheld the Catholic cause. On the charge, which was put forward by the Donatists, that he and his brother Apringius were implicated in the revolt of Heraclian, Marcellinus and his brother were arrested by Marinus, Count of Africa, who had them condemned and decapitated. Augustine visited him in prison and testified to his upright character. Subsequently Emperor Honorius exonerated his name and recognized his work in the interests of peace. Augustine praised Marcellinus highly in several letters and dedicated his De civitate Dei to him. Cardinal Baronius added his name to the Roman Martyrology.

Feast: Apr. 6.

Bibliography: orosius, Hist. 7:42; 17. jerome, Adv. Pelag. 3:19. augustine, Epist. 128; 129; 133; 136; 143. w. ensslin, Paulys Realenzyklopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft 14.2 (1930) 144546. h. w. phillot, A Dictionary of Christian Biography 3: 806807. f. van der meer, Augustine the Bishop, tr. b. battershaw and g. r. lamb (New York 1962).

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Marcellinus, Flavius

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