Chagrin, Francis

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CHAGRIN, FRANCIS

CHAGRIN, FRANCIS (1905–1972), French composer. Born in Bucharest into a wealthy family, Chagrin studied engineering in accordance with his father's wishes, but subsequently left home to study composition in Paris with Paul *Dukas and Nadia Boulanger. Before World War ii he moved to London, where he settled, and continued his studies with Matyás *Seiber (1944–46). He joined the French section of the bbc Overseas Service in 1941, for which he was made an Officer of the Academie Française. He founded the Society for the Promotion of New Music (spnm) in 1943, thus giving many young composers their first hearing. His works include two symphonies (he was at work on the third at the time of his death); Prelude and Fugue, and suites, for orchestra; a piano concerto; over 100 songs; piano pieces; and incidental music to Shaw's Heartbreak House and Gozzi's ii Ré Cervo.

[Max Loppert (2nd ed.)]

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Chagrin, Francis

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