Skip to main content

Nizhny Novgorod

Nizhny Novgorod (nyēsh´nyī nôf´gərəd), formerly Gorky or Gorki, city (1989 pop. 1,438,000), capital of Nizhny Novgorod region and the administrative center of the Volga federal district, E European Russia, on the Volga and Oka rivers. A major river port and a rail and air center, it is one of the chief industrial cities of Russia. Heavy machinery, steel, chemicals, and textiles are produced. The city is the site of one of the largest automobile factories in Russia. Nizhny Novgorod stretches along the Volga and Oka rivers and is surrounded by large satellite towns such as Bakna Bor, Pravinsk, and Kstovo. In 1221 a prince of Vladimir founded the city as a frontier post against the Volga Bulgars and Mordovians. It became a major trading point for Russia and the East. In 1350 it became the capital of the Suzdal–Nizhny Novgorod principality and was annexed in 1392 by Moscow. From 1608 to 1612 the city was the rallying point for the Russian army that defeated the Polish, Lithuanian, and Cossack armies. Nizhny Novgorod was famous for its annual trade fairs, held from 1817 to 1930, except during the Bolshevik Revolution and the civil war. Its turreted stone kremlin dates from the 13th cent. There are two 13th-century churches, a palace (1625–31), the Uspensky church (1672–74), and the Stroganov and Christmas churches (late 17th-early 18th cent.). The university was founded in 1918. Nizhny Novgorod was named Gorky from 1932 to 1991 for Maxim Gorky, who was born there.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Nizhny Novgorod." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Nizhny Novgorod." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 18, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nizhny-novgorod

"Nizhny Novgorod." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nizhny-novgorod

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.