Skip to main content

Massachusetts Board of Retirement v. MURGIA 427 U.S. 307 (1976)

MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF RETIREMENT v. MURGIA 427 U.S. 307 (1976)

inMurgia the Supreme Court, asked to subject age discrimination to heightened judicial scrutiny, declined the invitation, 7–1. In a per curiam opinion the Court upheld a state law limiting membership in the uniformed state police to persons under the age of fifty, irrespective of an older person's ability to pass physical or other tests of qualification. There was not a murmur in the Court's opinion about irrebuttable presumptions, nor was age a suspect classification; although the aged were not free from discrimination, they had not experienced "purposeful unequal treatment" or disabilities imposed "on the basis of stereotyped characteristics not truly indicative of their abilities." With that breathtaking inaccuracy behind it, the Court applied the most permissive form of rational basis review, noted that physical ability generally declines with age, and concluded that because the mandatory retirement rule was not "wholly unrelated" to the objective of maintaining a physically fit police force, the law was valid. Justice thurgood marshall, in lone dissent, repeated his long-standing argument that the Court should abandon its "two-tier" system of standards of review in favor of a system that matched the level of judicial scrutiny in equal protection cases to the interests at stake in each case.

Kenneth L. Karst
(1986)

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Massachusetts Board of Retirement v. MURGIA 427 U.S. 307 (1976)." Encyclopedia of the American Constitution. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Massachusetts Board of Retirement v. MURGIA 427 U.S. 307 (1976)." Encyclopedia of the American Constitution. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/massachusetts-board-retirement-v-murgia-427-us-307-1976

"Massachusetts Board of Retirement v. MURGIA 427 U.S. 307 (1976)." Encyclopedia of the American Constitution. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/massachusetts-board-retirement-v-murgia-427-us-307-1976

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.