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currant

currant, northern shrub of the family Saxifragaceae (saxifrage family), of the same genus (Ribes) as the gooseberry bush. The tart berries of the currant may be black, white, or red; the white gooseberry becomes purple when mature. Both, especially the larger European species, are eaten fresh and also used in preserves, sauces, and pies. Because the plants act as a host to blister rust, their cultivation in America is discouraged, and in regions of infection the wild species are eradicated. Native Americans used dried currants in making pemmican, but the "dried currant" of commerce is a small raisin. Indian currant is a name for a West Coast species and for the coralberry of the honeysuckle family. Native species of gooseberry are sometimes cultivated in gardens. Currant is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Saxifragaceae.

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currant

cur·rant / ˈkərənt/ • n. 1. a small dried fruit, from a seedless variety of grape native to the eastern Mediterranean region, now widely produced in California. 2. a Eurasian shrub (genus Ribes) of the gooseberry family that produces small edible black, red, or white berries. ∎  a berry from such a shrub.

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currant

currant dried fruit prepared from a dwarf seedless grape of the Levant; transf. (XVI) to species of Ribes, popularly supposed to be the source of the Levantine currant. orig. (XIV) in pl. phr. raysons of coraunce (see RAISIN) — AN. raisins de corauntz, for OF. raisins de Corinthe grapes of Corinth (their orig. place of export).

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currant

currant Any of several mainly deciduous shrubs and their fruits, rich in vitamin C. Black, red, and white currants are included in the genus Ribes: they are popular plants, cultivated widely. The fruits are used in pies, preserves, and syrups. Family Grossulariaceae.

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currant

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