coriander

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CORIANDER

CORIANDER , plant called gad in the Bible and kusbar in the Mishnah and the Targum Pseudo-Jonathan. The *manna is described as being "like coriander seed, white" (Ex. 16:31), and "like coriander seed, and in color it was like bdellium" (Num. 11:7). Rashi stresses that the comparison is "in respect of the roundness" and not of the color of coriander, which is not white. It is the Coriandrum sativum, an annual plant of the Umbelliferae family; it has white flowers arranged in umbels and globular beige or brown fruit, and its leaves and fruit are used as a spice. It grows wild in the Judean mountains but not in Galilee, which explains the statement of the Talmud that the inhabitants used to mock the Galileans for setting such high store upon coriander (kusbar), saying: "Kusbar, kusbarta, who classed you among the spices?" (tj, Dem. 1:1, 21d). Since its seed has a pungent taste, it was used for adulterating pepper (Tosef., bb 5:6). The eating of coriander was regarded as ensuring "fleshy children" (Ket. 61a).

bibliography:

J. Feliks, Olam ha-Ẓome'aḥ ha-Mikra'i (1957), 180; idem, Kilei Zera'im ve-Harkavah (1967), 62f.; Loew, Flora, 3 (1924), 441f.

[Jehuda Feliks]

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co·ri·an·der / ˈkôrēˌandər; ˌkôrēˈandər/ • n. an aromatic Mediterranean plant (Coriandrum sativum) of the parsley family, the leaves and seeds of which are used as culinary herbs.

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coriander Strong-smelling herb of the carrot family native to the Mediterranean and Near East. The leaves, the ground seeds and oil from the seeds are used as aromatic flavourings in foods, medicines and liqueurs. Family Apiaceae/Umbelliferae; species Coriandrum sativum.

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coriander A herb, Coriandrum sativum (a member of the parsley family); the leaf is used fresh or dried, and the dried fruit (dhanyia) as a spice in meat products, bakery goods, gin, and curry powder.

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coriander the plant Coriandrum sativum. XIV. — (O)F. coriandre — L. coriandrum — Gr. korīannon, -dron.