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slug

slug1 / sləg/ • n. 1. a tough-skinned terrestrial mollusk (order Stylommatophora, class Gastropoda) that typically lacks a shell and secretes a film of mucus for protection. It can be a serious plant pest. See also sea slug. 2. a slow, lazy person; a sluggard. 3. an amount of an alcoholic drink, typically liquor, that is gulped or poured: he took a slug of whiskey. 4. an elongated, typically rounded piece or metal. ∎  a counterfeit coin; a token. ∎  a bullet, esp. one of lead. ∎  a missile for an air gun. ∎  a line of type in Linotype printing. ∎  Printing a metal bar used in spacing. • v. (slugged , slugging ) [tr.] drink (something, typically alcohol) in a large draft; swig. slug2 inf. • v. (slugged , slug·ging ) [tr.] strike (someone) with a hard blow: he was the one who'd get slugged. ∎  (slug it out) settle a dispute or contest by fighting or competing fiercely: they went outside to slug it out. • n. a hard blow.

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slug

slug, name for a terrestrial gastropod mollusk in which the characteristic molluscan shell is reduced to a thin plate embedded in the tissues. Like the terrestrial snails of the same order, slugs have a distinct head with a mouth, tentacles bearing eyes, and a lung for breathing air. They move on a muscular foot over a trail of slime which they secrete. Certain species, such as Limax maximus, have become serious pests in gardens and truck farms, particularly in the W United States. Gliding out to feed at night, they devour both the roots and aerial portions of plants with their rasplike radula. Terrestrial slugs are classified in the phylum Mollusca, class Gastropoda, order Stylommatophora.

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slug

slug1 sluggard XV; †slow-sailing vessel XVI; slow-moving shell-less land-snail XVIII. Based on a stem slug-, repr. also by slug vb. be slow or inert (XV) and earlier by, e.g., †sluggy sluggish (XIII); prob. of Scand. orig. (cf. Sw. dial. slogga be sluggish, Norw. dial. slugg large heavy body).
So sluggish (-ISH1), sluggard (-ARD) XIV, slugabed XVI.

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slug

slug Mostly terrestrial gastropod mollusc, identified by the lack of shell and uncoiled viscera. It secretes a protective slime, which is also used to aid locomotion. Length: to 20cm (8in). Class Gastropoda; subclass Pulmonata; genera Arion, Limax. See also sea slug

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slug

slug2 irregularly shaped bullet XVII; (typogr.) metal bar, line of type XIX. perh. identical with prec.

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slug

slugbug, chug, Doug, drug, dug, fug, glug, hug, jug, lug, mug, plug, pug, rug, shrug, slug, smug, snug, thug, trug, tug •bedbug • ladybug • doodlebug •humbug • firebug • thunderbug •jitterbug, litterbug •shutterbug • Rawlplug • earplug •fireplug • hearthrug

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