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scallop

scallop or pecten, marine bivalve mollusk. Like its close relative the oyster, the scallop has no siphons, the mantle being completely open, but it differs from other mollusks in that both mantle edges have a row of steely blue "eyes" and tactile projections. The rounded shells have radiating ribs with flared "ears" or "wings" at the hinge. Scallops are capable of swimming or leaping about by snapping their shells, which are controlled by a powerful adductor muscle, the only part of the animal that is eaten. Scallops are more common on the Atlantic coast than the Pacific. The common scallop is about 2 in. (5 cm) long. Found abundantly in shallow and offshore waters and in eelgrass and mud flats from Cape Cod to Texas, it is taken in large numbers around Long Island. The giant scallop, found in deeper waters from Labrador to New Jersey, attains a length of 5 in. (12.7 cm). Scallops are classified in the phylum Mollusca, class Pelecypoda or Bivalvia, order Filibranchia, family Pectinidae.

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scallop

scal·lop / ˈskäləp; ˈskal-/ • n. 1. an edible bivalve mollusk (family Pectinidae) with a ribbed fan-shaped shell. Scallops swim by rapidly opening and closing the shell valves. ∎  a small pan or dish shaped like a scallop shell and used for baking or serving food. 2. (usu. scallops) each of a series of convex rounded projections forming an ornamental edging cut in material or worked in lace or knitting. 3. another term for escalope. • v. (-loped , -lop·ing ) 1. [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (scalloped) ornament (an edge or material) with scallops: a scalloped neckline. 2. [intr.] [usu. as n.] (scalloping) gather or dredge for scallops. 3. [tr.] bake with milk or a sauce: [as adj.] (scalloped) scalloped potatoes. DERIVATIVES: scal·lop·er n.

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scallop

scallop.
1. Classical architectural enrichment derived from the shell of a scallop with many applications including the decoration of the quarter-spherical heads of arched apses and niches.

2. Romanesque moulding consisting of a series of convex lobes similar to a scale moulding, but in one series only, like the edge of an apron. A variety of it to a very large scale was used by Neo-Classical architects, often for friezes.

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scallop

scallop Edible bivalve mollusc. One shell, or valve, is usually convex and the other almost flat. The shell's surface is ribbed (scalloped). Most scallops have a row of eyes that fringe the fleshy mantle. Width: 2.5–20cm (1–8in). Family Pectinidae.

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scallop

scallop, scollop kind of shellfish; shell of this, esp. as a pilgrim's badge XIV; formation resembling the edge of a scallop-shell XVII. Aphetic — OF. escalope, app. of Gmc. orig.

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scallop

scallop or scalloped capital. See capital.

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scallop

scallop •ketchup •callop, escallop, escalope, gallop, galop, Salop, shallop •develop, envelop •collop, dollop, gollop, lollop, scallop, scollop, trollop, Trollope, wallop •codswallop • Stanhope • larrup •satrap • caltrop •stirrup, syrup (US sirup) •Europearchbishop, bishop •tittup

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