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Tyrannosaurus

Tyrannosaurus (tīrăn´ōsôr´əs, tĬr–) [Gr.,=tyrant lizard], member of a family, Tyrannosauridae, of bipedal carnivorous saurischian dinosaurs characterized by having strong hind limbs, a muscular tail, and short forelimbs. Tyrannosaurids are theropods, having three toes on the hind feet. The oldest known tyrannosaurids lived approximately 120 million years ago. Fossilized bones have been found in Asia, North America, and Australia. The family includes Albertosaurus,Tarbosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus.

The best known species is the huge North American Tyrannosaurus rex, which lived around 70 million years ago. The largest were an estimated 39 ft (12 m) in total length and weighed around 10 tons. They had an elongated skull and large, spike-shaped teeth in jaws that could open to a 4-ft (122-cm) gape. Like the other tyrannosaurids, the short forelimbs had two fingers armed, like the three digits of the powerful hind limbs, with sharp, curved claws; on the foot was a spurred toe not reaching to the ground. T. rex is believed to have existed only for a short time in the late Cretaceous period and to have dominated the North American continent at that time; fossil remains have been found in the W United States.

For many years T. rex was believed to be the largest carnivorous dinosaur, but this honor was challenged by the 1995 discovery of the 42.6-ft (13-m) Giganotosaurus carolinii in Patagonia, the 1996 discovery of the 45-ft (13.7-m) Carcharodontosaurus saharicus in the Moroccan Sahara, and subsequent finds. Remains of a second Tyrannosaurus species, T. bataar, have been found in Mongolia. It was a contemporary of T. rex, but was somewhat smaller and had a comparatively smaller head and shorter arms.

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tyrannosaurus

tyrannosaurus Any of several species of large, bipedal, carnivorous, theropod dinosaurs that lived during late Cretaceous times. Its head, 1.2m (4ft) long, was armed with a series of dagger-like teeth. The hind legs were stout and well developed, but the forelegs may have been useless except for grasping at close range. The best-known species is T. rex. Length: 14m (47ft); height: 6.5m (20ft).

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tyrannosaur

ty·ran·no·saur / təˈranəˌsôr/ (also tyrannosaurus / təˌranəˈsôrəs/ ) • n. a very large bipedal carnivorous dinosaur (family Tyrannosauridae, infraorder Carnosauria, suborder Theopoda) of the late Cretaceous period, with powerful jaws and small clawlike front legs.

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Tyrannosaurus rex

Tyrannosaurus rex (order Saurischia, suborder Theropoda) A giant, carnivorous dinosaur which lived during the Upper Cretaceous in N. America and possibly in Asia. Individuals grew to 12 m in length, 5 m tall, and weighed about 7 tonnes. The name means ‘king of the tyrant lizards’, but T. rex was probably a scavenger with a top speed of 16–40 km/h.

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tyrannosaur

tyrannosaur a very large bipedal carnivorous dinosaur of the late Cretaceous period, with powerful jaws and small claw-like front legs; Tyrannosaurus rex is the best-known species. The name is modern Latin, and is formed from Greek turannos ‘tyrant’ + sauros ‘lizard’, on the pattern of dinosaur.

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Tyrannosaurus rex

Tyrannosaurus rex Giant, carnivorous dinosaur which lived during the Upper Cretaceous in N. America and possibly in Asia. Individuals grew to 12 m in length, 5 m tall, and weighed about 7 tonnes. The apt name means ‘king of the tyrant lizards’.

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tyrannosaurus

tyrannosaurusArras, embarrass, harass •gynandrous, polyandrous •Pancras • charas • Tatras • disastrous •ferrous • leprous • ambidextrous •Carreras, mayoress •scabrous •cirrus, Pyrrhus •chivalrous •citrous, citrus •ludicrous • tenebrous •Cyrus, Epirus, papyrus, virus •fibrous • hydrous • Cyprus •retrovirus • monstrous •brachiosaurus, brontosaurus, canorous, chorus, Epidaurus, Horus, megalosaurus, pelorus, porous, sorus, stegosaurus, Taurus, thesaurus, torus, tyrannosaurus •walrus •ochrous (US ocherous) •cumbrous • wondrous • lustrous •Algeciras, Severus •desirous •Arcturus, Epicurus, Honduras •barbarous • tuberous • slumberous •Cerberus • rapturous •lecherous, treacherous •torturous • vulturous • Pandarus •slanderous • ponderous •malodorous, odorous •thunderous • murderous •carboniferous, coniferous, cruciferous, melliferous, odoriferous, pestiferous, somniferous, splendiferous, umbelliferous, vociferous •phosphorous, phosphorus •sulphurous (US sulfurous) •Anaxagoras, Pythagorasclangorous, languorous •rigorous, vigorous •dangerous • verdurous •cankerous, cantankerous, rancorous •decorous • Icarus • valorous •dolorous • idolatrous •amorous, clamorous, glamorous •timorous •humerus, humorous, numerous •murmurous • generous • sonorous •onerous • obstreperous • Hesperus •vaporous • viviparous • viperous •Bosporus, prosperous •stuporous • cancerous •Monoceros, rhinoceros •sorcerous • adventurous • Tartarus •nectarous • dexterous • traitorous •preposterous • slaughterous •boisterous, roisterous •uterus • adulterous • stertorous •cadaverous • feverous •carnivorous, herbivorous, insectivorous, omnivorous •Lazarus

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Tyrannosaurus Rex

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Resources

Tyrannosaurus rex (T. rex), was a meat-eating (canivorous) dinosaur, and is the most famous of the Tryannosaurids (tyrant reptile). Despite its popularity, T. rex appears to have had a limited range in North America and Asia, and existed for a relatively short period of time. T. rex appeared during the late Cretaceous period, about 85 million to 65 million years ago. This was toward the end of the Mesozoic era or the Age of Reptiles, and just prior to the dinosaurs extinction.

Based on fossils, T. rex weighed 5-6 tons, stood about 15 feet (4 m) tall, was 20-46 ft (6.5-15 m) long, and had 6-in (15 cm) long, sharp, and jagged teeth.

Its skull was one-piece, with no moving parts except at the joint of the jaw. The compartments in the skull and in the lower jaw that housed the muscles were enlarged more than in any other predator. Its snout was sharply pinched to clear its field of vision. Its eyes faced forward to provide some overlap between visual fields from the right and left eyes, permitting stereoscopic vision.

This lizard-hipped dinosaur walked upright on two powerful hind legs, which ended in birdlike feet (indeed, it may have been evolutionarily related to birds, complete with the possession of feathers for a time during its development) with three forward-pointing toes with large claws. These were its weapons. Evolution shortened its torso for balance and speed. Some say the beast was surprisingly slender-limbed, graceful, and fast, able to attack other slower plant-eating dinosaurs such as the Triceratops. Although it possessed two small and muscular forelimbs, many paleontologists believe they were of little practical use.

Resources

BOOKS

Cohen, Daniel. Tyrannosaurus Rex. Mankato, MN:Capstone Press, 2006.

Kim, Sam. Tyrannosaurus Rex. Seoul: Kobook Limited, 2003.

Matthews, Rupert. Gone Forever: Tyrannosaurus Rex. New York: Heinemann, 2004.

Laurie Toupin

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Tyrannosaurus rex

Tyrannosaurus rex

Tyrannosaurus rex or T. rex, is easily the most famous of the Tryannosaurids (tyrant reptile). Despite its popularity, T. rex appears to have had a limited range in North America and Asia , and existed for a relatively short period of time . T. rex appeared during the late Cretaceous Period, about 85 million to 65 million years ago. This was toward the end of the Mesozoic Era or the Age of Reptiles , and just prior to the dinosaurs' extinction . Many people grow up believing that T. rex was the "King of the dinosaurs," as implied by the addition of rex after its name. However, it was neither the largest dinosaur of its time nor the most intelligent, and at least one paleontologist argues that although it was a teropod or meat-eating dinosaur, T. rex was not even a predator .

But there is no doubt that it was big. Based on fossils founds, T. rex weighed 5-6 tons, stood about 15 ft (4 m) tall, was 20-46 ft (6.5-15 m) long, and had 6 in (15 cm) long, sharp, serrated teeth. It is currently believed that T. rex was the largest terrestrial carnivore of all time.

Its skull was one unified whole, solidly constructed, with no moving parts except at the joint of the jaw. The compartments in the skull and in the lower jaw that housed the muscles were enlarged more than in any other predator. Its snout was sharply pinched to clear its field of vision. Its eyes faced forward to provide some overlap between visual fields from the right and left eyes, permitting stereoscopic vision.

This lizard-hipped dinosaur walked upright on two powerful hind legs, which ended in birdlike feet with three forward-pointing toes with large claws. These were its weapons. Evolution shortened its torso for balance and speed. Some say the beast was surprisingly slender-limbed, graceful, and fast, able to attack other slower plant-eating dinosaurs such as the Triceratops. Although it possessed two small and muscular forelimbs, many paleontologists believe they were of little practical use.

At least one paleontologist, Jack Horner, of the Museum of the Rockies (Bozeman, MT), recently raised the question as to whether or not T. rex was an effective hunter, given its small eyes, small arms, and relatively slow gait. Horner theorizes that T. rex scavenged its food from other animals' kills instead of killing its own. He supports this theory citing the beast's large olfactory lobes, which would be able to smell dead animals from a great distance, and its powerful legs with the thigh about the size of the calf as in humans, which were built for walking long stretches. As with any theory, there are many arguments refuting this hypothesis. Dr. Kenneth Carpenter from the Denver Museum of Natural History found a healed T. rex tooth mark on the tail of a hadrosaur (a duck-billed dinosaur), proving to many that T. rex was an active predator. Other experts say that the small eyes do not necessarily imply poor vision, the forearms were not needed for predation, and its gait, in spite of its bulk, was far from slow.

A coprolite (fossilized feces) believed to be from a T. rex was found in Saskatchewan, Canada by a team led by Karen Chin. This 65 million-year-old specimen contained chunks of bones believed to be from the head frill of a Triceratops, an herbivorous (plant-eating) dinosaur eaten by the T. rex. The coprolite is a whitish-green rock that is 17 in (44 cm) long, 6 in (15 cm) high and 5 in (13 cm) wide. This fossil provides evidence that T. rex crushed bones before swallowing them, since the bones in this coprolite were broken up.

Resources

books

Bakker, Robert T. The Dinosaur Heresies. William Morrow and Company, Inc. 1986.

Lambert, David, the Diagram Group. The Field Guide to Prehistoric Life. Facts On File Publications. 1985.

Norman, David. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs. Crescent Books, 1985.

Palmer, Douglas. The Marshall Illustrated Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs & Prehistoric Animals: A Comprehensive Color Guide to over 500 Species. New York: Todtri, 2002.

Tweedie, Michael. The World of Dinosaurs. William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1977.


periodicals

Chin, K., G.M. Erickson, et al. "A King-sized Theropod Coprolite." Nature 393 (June 18): 680.


Laurie Toupin

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