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partridge

partridge Any of several species of gamebirds found worldwide. True partridges of Europe belong to the pheasant family (Phasianidae), and include the common partridge Perdix perdix, which has been introduced to n America. It lives on heathland, scrub and farmland, and feeds on plants and insects.

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partridges

partridges See PHASIANIDAE.

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"partridges." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Partridges

Partridges

Partridges are species of fowl in the family Phasianidae, which also includes the pheasants, chickens, turkeys, grouse, peafowl, francolins, and quail. Partridges occur naturally in Eurasia, but they have been introduced as gamebirds to other places as well, including North America.

Partridges are medium-sized, stocky birds with short, rounded wings, a short tail, and a short, stout bill, in which the upper mandible overhangs the tip of the lower. The legs are short and stout, and the feet are strong and armed with sharp claws, useful for digging and scratching while foraging for food on the ground.

Partridges eat a wide variety of seeds, fruits, leaves, and buds, as well as invertebrates, which are captured on the ground. The chicks mostly eat arthropods, switching to a diet richer in plant foods after much of their initial growth has been completed.

Partridges build their nests in a concealed place on the ground, and they may lay as many as 15 eggs. These are incubated only by the female, which also has the sole responsibility for raising the chicks. Baby partridges are precocious, and can walk, run after their mother, and feed themselves soon after hatching. Partridges sexually mature at an age of about one year. During the non-breeding season, partridges assemble into flocks, which forage and roost together.

Like most other species in their family, partridges are gamebirds, and are hunted as food and for sport. As result, partridges are economically important, but they are also vulnerable to overhunting, which can severely reduce the sizes of their populations. It is critical that these birds be conserved by careful regulation of hunting-related predation, as well as by management and preservation of their necessary habitat.

The Hungarian, European, or gray partridge (Perdix perdix ) is a wide-ranging species that is native from the British Isles, through Europe and Russia, to Mongolia. However, this species has been introduced as a gamebird well beyond its natural range. The gray partridge is now an established species in North America, occurring in various places from southern Canada to the northern and middle United States.

The chukar (Alectoris chukar ) is native to mountainous habitats of Europe and Asia. This species has been introduced as a gamebird to drier, open mountain habitats in southwestern Canada and the northwestern United States.

Bill Freedman

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Partridges

Partridges

Partridges are species of fowl in the family Phasianidae, which also includes the pheasants , chickens, turkeys , grouse , peafowl , francolins, and quail . Partridges occur naturally in Eurasia, but they have been introduced as game birds to other places as well, including North America .

Partridges are medium-sized, stocky birds with short, rounded wings, a short tail, and a short, stout bill, in which the upper mandible overhangs the tip of the lower. The legs are short and stout, and the feet are strong and armed with sharp claws, useful for digging and scratching while foraging for food on the ground.

Partridges eat a wide variety of seeds , fruits , leaves, and buds, as well as invertebrates , which are captured on the ground. The chicks mostly eat arthropods , switching to a diet richer in plant foods after much of their initial growth has been completed.

Partridges build their nests in a concealed place on the ground, and they may lay as many as 15 eggs. These are incubated only by the female, which also has the sole responsibility for raising the chicks. Baby partridges are precocious, and can walk, run after their mother, and feed themselves soon after hatching. Partridges sexually mature at an age of about one year. During the nonbreeding season, partridges assemble into flocks, which forage and roost together.

Like most other species in their family, partridges are gamebirds, and are hunted as food and for sport. As a result, partridges are economically important, but they are also vulnerable to over-hunting, which can severely reduce the sizes of their populations. It is critical that these birds be conserved by careful regulation of hunting-related predation, as well as by management and preservation of their necessary habitat .

The Hungarian, European, or grey partridge (Perdix perdix) is a wide-ranging species that is native from the British Isles, through Europe and Russia, to Mongolia.
However, this species has been introduced as a gamebird well beyond its natural range. The grey partridge is now an established species in North America, occurring in various places from southern Canada to the northern and middle United States.

The chukar (Alectoris chukar) is native to mountainous habitats of Europe and Asia . This species has been introduced as a gamebird to drier, open mountain habitats in southwestern Canada and the northwestern United States.

Bill Freedman

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"Partridges." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Partridges." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/partridges

"Partridges." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved September 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/partridges

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Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
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  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.