Skip to main content
Select Source:

barracuda

barracuda, slender, elongated fish of tropical seas. Barracudas have long snouts and projecting lower jaws armed with large, sharp-edged teeth. They are ferocious, striking at anything that gleams, and are considered excellent game fishes. The largest of the group, the great barracuda, averages 5 ft (1.5 m) in length but may reach 10 ft (3 m); it is dangerous to swimmers wearing shiny objects. Other species are the Pacific barracuda (4 ft/1.2 m long) and the smaller Northern barracuda, which is not dangerous. Barracudas are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Actinopterygii, order Perciformes, family Sphyraenidae.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"barracuda." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"barracuda." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

"barracuda." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

barracuda

bar·ra·cu·da / ˌberəˈkoōdə/ • n. (pl. same or barracudas ) a large, predatory tropical marine fish (genus Sphyraena, family Sphyraenidae) with a slender body and large jaws and teeth. Its several species include the inedible and poisonous great barracuda (S. barracuda) and the edible Pacific barracuda (S. argentea).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"barracuda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"barracuda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda-0

"barracuda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

barracuda

barracuda Marine fish found in tropical Atlantic and Pacific waters. Known to attack people, it has a large mouth with many large, razor-sharp teeth. It is long, slender and olive-green. Length: usually 1.2–1.8m (4–6ft); weight: 1.4–22.7kg (3–50lb). The great barracuda of the Florida coast grows to 2.5m (8ft). Family Sphyraenidae; there are 20 species.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"barracuda." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"barracuda." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

"barracuda." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

barracuda

barracuda See SPHYRAENIDAE.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"barracuda." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"barracuda." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda

"barracuda." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

barracuda

barracudaBarbuda, barracuda, Bermuda, brooder, Buxtehude, colluder, deluder, excluder, intruder, Judah, Luda, Neruda, obtruder, Tudor •mouthbrooder •Buddha, do-gooder •Kaunda, Munda •judder, rudder, shudder, udder •numdah •asunder, blunder, chunder, hereunder, plunder, rotunda, sunder, thereunder, thunder, under, up-and-under, wonder •husbander • seconder • Shetlander •mainlander • Greenlander •Queenslander • midlander •Little Englander •Highlander, islander •Icelander • Hollander • lowlander •Newfoundlander • woodlander •colander • Canada • Kannada •ambassador • forwarder •birder, Gerda, girder, herder, murder

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"barracuda." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"barracuda." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda

"barracuda." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Barracuda

Barracuda woof! The Lucifer Project 1978 (R)

Lots of innocent swimmers are being eaten by crazed killer barracudas. 90m/ C VHS . Wayne Crawford, Jason Evers, Roberta Leighton; D: Harry Kerwin.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Barracuda." VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Barracuda." VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/culture-magazines/barracuda

"Barracuda." VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/culture-magazines/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Barracuda

Barracuda

Predatory behavior

The great barracuda

The Pacific barracuda

Human fear of barracudas

Resources

A barracuda is a long, cylindrical, silvery fish. It has two widely separated dorsal fins, in roughly the same location as the two fins on its belly, and a forked tail. The largest species, the great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda ), seldom grows longer than 6.5 ft (2 m) and is an aggressive, fearsome predator of other fish. All barracudas have an underhung jaw that houses long, incredibly sharp teeth; their teeth are conically shaped, are larger in the front, like fangs, and their horizontal mouths can open very wide. In general, the barracuda inhabits tropical and warmer temperate waters throughout the world, specifically in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Different species of barracuda thrive in a variety of specific habitats but they are common over reefs and near continental shelves. Barracudas have been known to attack humans.

Barracudas are classified in the order Perciformes, an incredibly diverse group, containing 18 suborders and nearly 7,000 species of fish. Barracudas are classified in the suborder Scombroidei, which also includes tuna and marlins. Within their family (Sphyraenidae), there is one genus, Sphyraena, with 20 species.

Predatory behavior

Barracudas usually swim actively in clear water searching for schools of plankton-feeding fish. Their silver coloring and elongated bodies make them difficult for prey to detect, especially when viewing them head-on. Barracudas depend heavily on their sense of sight when they hunt, noticing everything that has an unusual color, reflection, or movement. Once a barracuda sights an intended victim, its long tail and matching anal and dorsal fins enable it to move with incredibly swift bursts of speed to catch its prey before

it can escape. Barracudas generally assault schools of fish, rushing at them head first and snapping their strong jaws right and left.

When barracudas are mature, they usually swim alone, however, there are circumstances when they tend to school, such as while they are young and when they are spawning. Additionally, to feed more easily, barracudas sometimes swim in groups. In this case, they can herd schools of fish into densely populated areas or chase them into shallow water; when the barracudas accomplish this, they can eat practically all the fish they want at leisure.

The great barracuda

As its name implies, the great barracuda is most notable because of its size. Like all species of barracuda, this species has a long, silvery body and very sharp teeth. It generally appears silvery with green or gray on its back and black blotches on its belly. However, this fish can change color to match its background environment. While individuals in most species of barracuda rarely grow longer than 5.5 ft (1.7 m), some specimens of the great barracuda have been reported to reach 10 ft (3 m) long. (Usually, members of this species average about 3 ft [0.9 m] long.) An aggressive hunter, the great barracuda inhabits temperate and tropical waters all over the world, except in certain parts of the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Specifically, it is found in the west Atlantic from Brazil to New England and in the Gulf of Mexico. Also, it is one of three barracuda species found in the Caribbean. The other two species are Sphyraena guachancho and Sphyraena picudilla. These two species, much smaller and more rare, often swim in the company of jacks, and are commonly named sennets.

The Pacific barracuda

A great deal is known about the Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena argentea ). It spends its winters off Mexico and joins a school in the spring to swim up the coast and spawn. Males are sexually mature when they are two or three years old; females mature one year later. The female Pacific barracuda lays her eggs at intervals, and the eggs float freely in the water. Measuring up to 4.9 ft (1.5 m) long, Pacific barracuda eat sardines. They are caught throughout the year off the Mexican coast and in the summertime off the California coast. Their meat is reportedly very good.

Human fear of barracudas

People who dive in tropical regions are often quite afraid of barracudas, fearing them even more than sharks. Often, divers in tropical waters report feeling as if there is someone watching them when they are submerged. With barracudas, this is probably the case. Barracudas are curious animals and commonly follow and watch divers, noticing any strange movements or colors. Unlike sharks, barracudas only attack their prey one time, usually with one massive bite.

Barracudas are not as dangerous as many people think. Unless they are provoked, they rarely attack. Barracuda attacks usually take place under certain circumstances, including: 1) when the water is very murky; 2) when a diver is carrying or wearing a shiny reflecting object, like jewelry; 3) when the barracuda is provoked; or 4) when a diver is carrying a wounded fish. Attacks can also be caused by excessive splashing or other irregular movements in the water, especially in murky conditions. Also, some people think that the likelihood of a barracuda attack depends on location. For instance, while the great barracuda seldom attacks humans in Hawaii, it is considered more dangerous in the West Indies.

Resources

BOOKS

Hauser, Hillary. Book of Fishes. New York: Pisces Books, 1992.

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Wildlife. London: Grey Castle Press, 1991.

Macmillan Illustrated Animal Encyclopedia. New York: Macmillan Publishing, 1992.

Moyle, Peter B., Joseph Cech. Fishes: An Introduction to Ichthyology. 5th ed. New York: Prentice Hall, 2003.

National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Fishes. Rev. ed. New York: Knopf, 2002.

Nelson, Joseph S. Fishes of the World. 4th ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2006.

The New Larousse Encyclopedia of Animal Life. New York: Bonanza Books, 1987.

Whiteman, Kate. World Encyclopedia of Fish & Shellfish. New York: Lorenz Books, 2000.

Kathryn Snavely

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Barracuda

Barracuda

A barracuda is a long, cylindrical, silvery fish . It has two widely separated dorsal fins, in roughly the same location as the two fins on its belly, and a forked tail. The largest species , the great barracuda, seldom grows longer than 6.5 ft (2 m) and is an aggressive fearsome predator of other fish. All barracudas have an underhung jaw that houses long, incredibly sharp teeth; their teeth are conically shaped, are larger in the front, like fangs, and their horizontal mouths can open very wide. In general, the barracuda inhabits tropical and warmer temperate waters throughout the world, specifically in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Different species of barracuda thrive in a variety of specific habitats but they are common over reefs and near continental shelves. Barracudas have been known to attack humans.

Barracudas are classified in the order Perciformes, an incredibly diverse group, containing 18 suborders and nearly 7,000 species of fish. Barracudas are the only fish in the suborder Sphyraenoidei and in the family Sphyraenidae. Within their family, there is one genus, Sphyraena, with 20 species.


Predatory behavior

Barracudas usually swim actively in clear water searching for schools of plankton-feeding fish. Their silver coloring and elongated bodies make them difficult for prey to detect, especially when viewing them head-on. Barracudas depend heavily on their sense of sight when they hunt, noticing everything that has an unusual color , reflection, or movement. Once a barracuda sights an intended victim, its long tail and matching anal and dorsal fins enable it to move with incredibly swift bursts of speed to catch its prey before it can escape. Barracudas generally assault schools of fish, rushing at them head first and snapping their strong jaws right and left.

When barracudas are mature, they usually swim alone, however, there are circumstances when they tend to school. Two such instances are while they are young and when they are spawning. Additionally, to feed more easily, barracudas sometimes swim in groups. In this case, they can herd schools of fish into densely populated areas or chase them into shallow water; when the barracudas accomplish this, they can eat practically all the fish they want at leisure.


The great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)

As its name implies, the great barracuda is most notable because of its size. Like all species of barracuda, this species has a long, silvery body and very sharp teeth. It generally appears silvery with green or gray on its back and black blotches on its belly. However, this fish can change color to match its background environment. While individuals in most species of barracuda rarely grow longer than 5.5 ft (1.7 m), some specimens of the great barracuda have been reported to reach 10 ft (3 m) long. (Usually, members of this species average about 3 ft [0.9 m] long.) An aggressive hunter, the great barracuda inhabits temperate and tropical waters all over the world, except in certain parts of the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Specifically, it is found in the west Atlantic from Brazil to New England and in the Gulf of Mexico. Also, it is one of three barracuda species found

in the Caribbean. The other two species are Sphyraena guachancho and Sphyraena picudilla. These two species, much smaller and more rare, often swim in the company of jacks and are commonly named sennets.


The Pacific barracuda

A great deal is known about the Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena argentea). It spends its winters off Mexico and joins a school in the spring to swim up the coast and spawn. Males are sexually mature when they are two or three years old; females mature one year later. The female Pacific barracuda lays her eggs at intervals, and the eggs float freely in the water. Measuring up to 4.9 ft (1.5 m) long, Pacific barracuda eat sardines . They are caught throughout the year off the Mexican coast and in the summertime off the California coast. Their meat is reportedly very good.

Human fear of barracudas

People who dive in tropical regions are often quite afraid of barracudas, fearing them even more than sharks . Often, divers in tropical waters report feeling as if there is "someone watching them" when they are submerged. With barracudas, this is probably the case. Barracudas are curious animals and commonly follow and watch divers, noticing any strange movements or colors. Unlike sharks, barracudas only attack their prey one time, usually with one massive bite.

Barracudas are not as dangerous as many people think. Unless they are provoked, they rarely attack. Barracuda attacks usually take place under certain circumstances, including: (1) when the water is very murky; (2) when a diver is carrying a shiny reflecting object, like jewelry; (3) when the barracuda is provoked; or (4) when a diver is carrying a wounded fish. Attacks can also be caused by excessive splashing or other irregular movements in the water, especially in murky conditions. Also, some people think that the likelihood of a barracuda attack depends on location. For instance, while the great barracuda seldom attacks humans in Hawaii, it is considered more dangerous in the West Indies.


Resources

books

Grzimek, H. C. Bernard, ed. Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1993.

Hauser, Hillary. Book of Fishes. New York: Pisces Books, 1992.

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Wildlife. London: Grey Castle Press, 1991.

MacMillan Illustrated Animal Encyclopedia. New York: MacMillan Publishing, 1992.

Moyle, Peter B., Joseph Cech. Fishes: An Introduction to Ichthyology. 4th ed. New York: Prentice Hall, 1999.

Nelson, Joseph S. Fishes of the World. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1994.

The New Larousse Encyclopedia of Animal Life. New York: Bonanza Books, 1987.

Whiteman, Kate. World Encyclopedia of Fish & Shellfish. New York: Lorenz Books, 2000.

Wilson, Josleen. The National Audubon Society Collection Nature Series, North American Fish. New York: Gramercy Books, 1991.


Kathryn Snavely

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda-0

"Barracuda." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/barracuda-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.