rake

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rake1 / rāk/ • n. an implement consisting of a pole with a crossbar toothed like a comb at the end, or with several tines held together by a crosspiece, used esp. for drawing together cut grass or smoothing loose soil or gravel. ∎  a wheeled implement used for the same purposes. ∎  a similar implement used for other purposes, e.g., by a croupier drawing in money at a gaming table. • v. [tr.] collect, gather, or move with a rake or similar implement: they started raking up hay. ∎  make (a stretch of ground) tidy or smooth with a rake: the infield dirt is meticulously raked. ∎  scratch or scrape (something, esp. a person's flesh) with a long sweeping movement: her fingers raked Bill's face. ∎  [tr.] draw or drag (something) with a long sweeping movement: she raked a comb through her hair. ∎  sweep (something) from end to end with gunfire, a look, or a beam of light: Greg let his high beams rake the shrubbery. ∎  [intr.] move across something with a long sweeping movement: his icy gaze raked mercilessly over Lissa's slender figure. ∎  [intr.] search or rummage through something: Nina decided to rake through the drawers. PHRASES: (as) thin as a rake (of a person) very thin.PHRASAL VERBS: rake in something inf. make a lot of money, typically very easily: he was now raking in $250 million a year. rake something up/over revive the memory of an incident or period of time that is best forgotten: I have no desire to rake over the past.DERIVATIVES: rak·er n. rake2 • n. a fashionable or wealthy man of dissolute or promiscuous habits. PHRASES: a rake's progress a progressive deterioration, esp. through self-indulgence. rake3 • v. [tr.] (often be raked) set (something, esp. a stage or the floor of an auditorium) at a sloping angle. ∎  [intr.] (of a ship's mast or funnel) incline from the perpendicular toward the stern. ∎  [intr.] (of a ship's bow or stern) project at its upper part beyond the keel. • n. 1. [in sing.] the angle at which a thing slopes. 2. the angle of the edge or face of a cutting tool.

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rakeache, awake, bake, betake, Blake, brake, break, cake, crake, drake, fake, flake, forsake, hake, Jake, lake, make, mistake, opaque, partake, quake, rake, sake, shake, sheikh, slake, snake, splake, stake, steak, strake, take, undertake, wake, wideawake •bellyache • clambake • headache •backache • pancake • teacake •seedcake • beefcake • cheesecake •fishcake • johnnycake • tipsy cake •rock cake • shortcake • oatcake •oilcake • fruitcake • cupcake •pat-a-cake • cornflake • snowflake •rattlesnake • handbrake • mandrake •heartbreak • airbrake • daybreak •jailbreak • canebrake • windbreak •tiebreak • corncrake • outbreak •footbrake • muckrake • earache •firebreak • namesake • keepsake •handshake • milkshake • heartache •beefsteak • sweepstake • stocktake •out-take • uptake • grubstake •wapentake • toothache • seaquake •kittiwake • moonquake • earthquake

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rake3 man of dissipated or loose habits. XVII. Clipped form of rakel (XVII), var. of arch. rakehell (XVI), f. RAKE1 + HELL.
Hence rakish2 (-ISH1) XVIII.

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rake1 implement consisting of a comb-like cross-bar fitted to a long handle. OE. raca m., racu fem. = MLG., MDu. rāke (Du. raak), rel. to Goth. ufrakjan stretch out, f. Gmc. base *rak- :- IE. *roĝ- *reĝ- move in a straight line, stretch, repr. also by RIGHT.
So vb. XIII. — ON. raka scrape, shave, rake; also f. the sb.

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rake2 (naut.) projection of hull at stem and stern beyond the keel line. XVII. f. rake vb. (XVII) have a rake, incline from the perpendicular; of unkn. orig.
Hence rakish1 (-ISH1) having a smart appearance like a fast-sailing ship. XIX (partly assoc. with next).

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Rake

colts or mules, collectively ; a row or series.

Examples : rake of coltsBk. of St. Albans, 1486; rake of hutches (a string of horses), 1901.

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rake1 rake's progress a progressive deterioration, especially through self-indulgence, from the title of a series of engravings by William Hogarth (1735), showing the rake's life progressing from its wealthy and privileged origins to debt, despair, and death on the gallows.

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Rake

RAKE. To fire down the length of a vessel's deck. This is the sailor's equivalent of the soldier's enfilade.

SEE ALSO Enfilade.

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rake2 as thin as a rake (of a person) very thin.
rake and scrape in Black English usage, be extremely thrifty; scrimp and save.
rake over the ashes revive the memory of an incident which is best forgotten.

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rake. Inclination or slope of anything, such as the top of a triangular pediment or a pitched roof.