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Ozarks, the

the Ozarks, or Ozark Plateau, upland region, actually a dissected plateau, c.50,000 sq mi (129,500 sq km), chiefly in S Mo. and N Ark., but partly in Oklahoma and Kansas, between the Arkansas and Missouri rivers. The Ozarks, which rise from the surrounding plains, are locally referred to as mountains. Composed of igneous rock overlain by limestone and dolomite, the ancient land form has been worn down by erosion. Summits (knobs) are found wherever there is a resistant rock outcrop; the Boston Mts. are the highest and most rugged section, with several peaks more than 2,000 ft (610 m) high. The Ozarks are rich in lead and zinc, and fruit-growing areas are prevalent. Subsistence farming and household crafts are found in the more isolated regions. The Ozarks have several large lakes that were created by dams across the White and Black rivers; the dams generate electricity. The scenic Ozarks, with forests, streams, and mineral springs, are a popular tourist region, and the construction of summer homes there has grown.

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Ozark plateau

Ozark plateau Mountainous upland region in s central USA, extending from sw Missouri across nw Arkansas into Oklahoma. The Boston Mountains contain the highest peaks, exceeding 610m (2000ft). The Ozarks are a source of lead and zinc. Noted for their scenery, forests and lakes, they are a popular tourist region. Area: c.129,500sq km (50,000sq mi).

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Ozark

Ozark (ō´zärk), city (1990 pop. 12,922), seat of Dale co., SE Ala.; settled 1820, inc. 1870. It is a shipping center for nuts and timber. Manufactures include aircraft, railcars, farm machinery, clothing, wood products, and fertilizer. U.S. Fort Rucker, the army's aviation flight training center, is nearby.

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