Inter-American Highway

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Pan-American Highway, system of roads, c.16,000 mi (25,750 km) long, linking the nations of the Western Hemisphere. It was suggested at the Fifth International Conference of American States (1923) and supported and financed by the United States during the 1940s and 1950s. Gaps are in Panama (Darién Gap) and N Colombia, in the section called the Inter-American Highway. The route from Yaviza (Panama) to Colombia is surveyed but not constructed. The section between the United States and the Panama Canal is popular with tourists driving to Mexico. Climatic zones along the highway vary from lush jungle to cold mountain passes nearly 15,000 ft (4,572 m) high. The scenery is often spectacular, and the highway crosses many picturesque localities. The system is far from uniform; some stretches are passable only during the dry season, and in several regions driving is occasionally hazardous. In the late 1960s, much of the highway was improved.

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Pan-American Highway Road system linking s USA, Mexico, Central America and South America. The system includes the Inter-American Highway, which connects Panama and Texas. Work on the Pan-American Highway started in the late 1920s, and the system is still being extended. By 1990, it included more than 47,000km (29,000mi) of roads.

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Inter-American Highway, c.3,400 mi (5,470 km) long, section of the Pan-American Highway system from Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, to Panama City, Panama. Much of the highway prior to 1941 had been built by the countries concerned, but wartime necessity led the United States to appropriate funds to assist completion. Later work was done by each nation on its own. The highway includes alternate routes and makes use of existing local roads. It is virtually complete, and many sections have been upgraded and paved.