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Fumigation (in Exorcism)

Fumigation (in Exorcism)

One of the most important rites during the exorcism of an evil spirit appears to have been the fumigation of the victim, and for this various prescriptions were given throughout occult history. If it was found difficult to dislodge the demon, a picture of him would sometimes be drawn, which was to be thrown into a fire after having been "signed with the cross, sprinkled with holy water, and fumigated."

At other times if the evil spirit refused to give his name the exorcist would fumigate the possessed person. The recipe for fumigation included such substances as asafoetida, sulphur, and salt. Fumigation was sometimes enhanced by flagellation.

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fumigation

fumigation (few-mig-ay-shŏn) n. the use of gases or vapours, such as formaldehyde or chlorine, to bring about disinfestation of clothing, buildings, etc.

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fumigation

fumigation: see disinfectant.

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Fumigation

Fumigation

Most commonly, fumigation refers to the process of disinfecting a material or an area by using some type of toxic material in gaseous form. The term has a more specialized meaning in environmental science , where it refers to the process by which pollutants are mixed in the atmosphere . Under certain conditions, emitted pollutants rise above a stable layer of air near the ground. These pollutants remain aloft until convective currents develop, often in the morning, at which time the cooler pollutants "trade places" with air at ground level as it is warmed by the sun and rises. The resulting damage to ecosystems from the pollutants is most obvious around metal smelters.

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