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Adonai

Adonai

A Hebrew word signifying "the Lord" and used by Jews when speaking or writing of "YHWH," or Yahweh, the ineffable name of God. The Jews entertained the deepest awe for this incommunicable and mysterious name, and this feeling led them to avoid pronouncing it and to substitute the word Adonai for "Jehovah" in their sacred text. The ancients attributed great power to names; to know and pronounce someone's name was to have power over them. Obviously one could not, like the Pagans, suggest that mere creatures had power over God.

This custom in Jewish prayers still prevails, especially among Hasidic Jews, who follow the Kabala and believe that the Holy Name of God, associated with miraculous powers, should not be profaned. Yahweh is their invisible protector and king, and no image of him is made. He is worshiped according to his commandments, with an observance of the ritual instituted through Moses. The term "YHWH" means the revealed Absolute Deity, the Manifest, Only, Personal, Holy Creator and Redeemer.

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Adonai

Adonai (Heb., ‘my Lord’). Jewish title of God. It is commonly used to replace the tetragrammaton (JHWH) when reading the text of the Hebrew scriptures, and its vowels, inserted into JHWH, thus produce the form Jehovah.

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"Adonai." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Adonai

Adonai a Hebrew name for God.

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Adonai

Adonai: see God.

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