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pride

pride / prīd/ • n. 1. a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one's own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired: the team was bursting with pride after recording a sensational victory a woman who takes great pride in her appearance. ∎  the consciousness of one's own dignity: he swallowed his pride and asked for help. ∎  the quality of having an excessively high opinion of oneself or one's importance: the sin of pride. ∎  a person or thing that is the object or source of a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction: the swimming pool is the pride of the community. ∎ poetic/lit. the best state or condition of something; the prime: in the pride of youth. 2. a group of lions forming a social unit. • v. (pride oneself on/upon) be especially proud of a particular quality or skill: she'd always prided herself on her ability to deal with a crisis. PHRASES: one's pride and joy a person or thing of which one is very proud and which is a source of great pleasure: the car was his pride and joy. pride of place the most prominent or important position among a group of things: the certificate has pride of place on my wall.DERIVATIVES: pride·ful / -fəl/ adj. pride·ful·ly / -fəlē/ adv.

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pride

pride unbridled self-esteem; in this sense, counted as the first of the seven deadly sins.
pride feels no pain proverbial saying, early 17th century, implying that inordinate self-esteem will not allow the admission that one might be suffering.
pride goes before a fall proverbial saying, late 14th century, often with the implication that proud and haughty behaviour will contribute to its own downfall. Originally with biblical allusion to Proverbs 16:18, ‘Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall’.
a pride of lions a group of lions forming a social unit; the term is recorded in late Middle English, and was revived in the early 20th century.
pride of place in falconry, the high position from which a falcon or similar bird swoops down on its prey; the term is first recorded in Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606).

See also peacock in his pride.

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pride

pride high opinion of oneself OE.; consciousness of what is fitting to oneself; (arch.) magnificence, pomp XIII; the prime or flower XV. Late OE. prȳde, secondary form (prob. after prūd PROUD or ON. prýði) of prȳte, prȳtu, abstr. sb. f. prūd.
Hence pride vb. † be proud; show oneself proud. XIII.

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Pride

Pride

a group, band, or flock of animals.

Examples : pride of lions, 1486; of peacocks (a peacock with feathers outspread is said to be in his pride), 1530.

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pride

prideabide, applied, aside, astride, backslide, beside, bestride, betide, bide, bride, chide, Clyde, cockeyed, coincide, collide, confide, cried, decide, divide, dried, elide, five-a-side, glide, guide, hide, hollow-eyed, I'd, implied, lied, misguide, nationwide, nide, offside, onside, outride, outside, pan-fried, pied, pie-eyed, popeyed, pride, provide, ride, Said, shied, side, slide, sloe-eyed, snide, square-eyed, starry-eyed, statewide, Strathclyde, stride, subdivide, subside, tide, tried, undyed, wall-eyed, wide, worldwide •carbide • unmodified •overqualified, unqualified •dignified, signified •unverified • countrified •unpurified • unclassified •unspecified • sissified • unsanctified •self-satisfied, unsatisfied •unidentified • unquantified •unfortified • unjustified • uncertified •formaldehyde • oxhide • rawhide •cowhide • allied • landslide • bolide •paraglide • polyamide • bromide •thalidomide • selenide • cyanide •unoccupied

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