William Travers Jerome

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The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. The Columbia University Press

Jerome, William Travers

William Travers Jerome, 1859–1934, American lawyer, b. New York City. Prominent in the cause of reform, he served (1894–95) on the Lexow commission to investigate political corruption and managed (1894) the successful campaign of William L. Strong for reform mayor of New York City. He helped frame the legislation that created the court of special sessions (1894) and became (1895) justice of that court. As district attorney (1901–9) of New York co., Jerome led a continuous and independent campaign against crime and political corruption. Frequently he led surprise raids in person, notably the one against the gambling house of Richard Canfield. Jerome was the prosecutor in the trial of Harry K. Thaw for the murder of Stanford White.

See biography by R. O'Connor (1963).

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