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Means, Philip Ainsworth

Philip Ainsworth Means, 1892–1944, American historian and archaeologist, b. Boston. An assistant on a Yale expedition to Peru (1914–15), he was later (1920–21) director of the National Museum of Archaeology at Lima, Peru. He traveled widely in Latin American countries, and between 1921 and 1932 he was several times an associate in anthropology at the Peabody Museum, Harvard. His works include History of the Spanish Conquest of Yucatan and of the Itzas (1917), Fall of the Inca Empire and the Spanish Rule in Peru, 1530–1780 (1932), The Spanish Main: Focus of Envy, 1492–1700 (1935).

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Marlowe, Philip

Marlowe, Philip a fictional detective, created by Raymond Chandler, who embodies the ‘private eye’ qualities described by Chandler in the comment, ‘Down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid.’

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Astrophel

Astrophel name adopted by Philip Sidney (1554–86) in his sonnet sequence Astrophel and Stella; the name means ‘star-lover’, and the poems give the course of his unhappy love for Stella (the ‘star’, modelled on Penelope Rich).

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