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heel

heel1 / hēl/ • n. 1. the back part of the foot below the ankle. ∎  a corresponding part of the foot in vertebrate animals. ∎  the part of the palm of the hand next to the wrist: he rubbed the heel of his hand against the window. ∎  the part of a shoe or boot supporting the heel: shoes with low heels. ∎  the part of a sock covering the heel. ∎  (heels) high-heeled shoes. 2. a thing resembling a heel in form or position, in particular: ∎  the end of a violin bow at which it is held. ∎  the part of the head of a golf club nearest the shaft. ∎  a crusty end of a loaf of bread, or the rind of a cheese. ∎  a piece of the main stem of a plant left attached to the base of a cutting. 3. inf. an inconsiderate or untrustworthy person: what kind of a heel do you think I am? 4. [as interj.] a command to a dog to walk close behind its owner. • v. [tr.] 1. fit or renew a heel on (a shoe or boot). 2. (of a dog) follow closely behind its owner: these dogs are born with the instinctive urge to heel. 3. [intr.] touch the ground with the heel when dancing. 4. Golf strike (the ball) with the heel of the club. PHRASES: at (or to) heel (of a dog) close to and slightly behind its owner. at the heels of (or at someone's heels) following closely behind: he headed off with Sammy at his heels. bring someone to heel bring someone under control. down at heel (of a shoe) with the heel worn down. ∎  having a poor, shabby appearance. kick up one's heels have a lively, enjoyable time. on the heels of following closely after: September frosts would be on the heels of the dog days of August. set someone back on their heels astonish or discomfit someone. turn on one's heel turn sharply around. under the heel of dominated or controlled by: the Greeks spent several centuries under the heel of the Ottoman Empire.DERIVATIVES: heeled / hēld/ adj. [in comb.] high-heeled shoes. heel·less adj. heel2 • v. [intr.] (of a boat or ship) be tilted temporarily by the pressure of wind or by an uneven distribution of weight on board.Compare with list2 . ∎  [tr.] cause (a boat or ship) to lean over in such a way. • n. an instance of a ship leaning over in such a way. ∎  the degree of incline of a ship's leaning measured from the vertical.

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heel

heel bring someone to heel bring someone under control.
down at heel having a poor, shabby appearance.
in the heel of the hunt in Irish usage, at the last minute; finally.
kick up one's heels have a lively, enjoyable time.
take to one's heels run away.
under the heel of dominated or controlled by.

See also Achilles' heel, dig in one's heels, drag one's heels.

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heel

heel2 incline to one side. XVI. prob. evolved from †heeld, †hield through apprehending final d as a pt.-pp. suffix. OE. hieldan = OS. ofheldian, MDu. helden (Du. hellen) :- WGmc. *χalþjan, f. Gmc. *χalþaz (OE. heald, OHG. hald, ON. hallr inclined).

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heel

heel1 hinder part of the foot OE. hēla, hǣla, ccrr. to MDu. hiele (Du. hiel), ON. hæll :- Gmc. *χāχil- :- *χaŋχil-, f. *χaŋχ- (whence OE. hōh heel), rel. to Lith. kīnka hough.

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heel

heel. That end of the bow of a str. instr. at which it is held, as distinguished from the other end, which is called ‘point’.

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heel

heel (heel) n. the part of the foot that extends behind the ankle joint. See calcaneus.

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heel

heelallele, anele, anneal, appeal, Bastille, Beale, Castile, chenille, cochineal, cockatiel, conceal, congeal, creel, deal, eel, Emile, feel, freewheel, genteel, Guayaquil, heal, heel, he'll, keel, Kiel, kneel, leal, Lille, Lucille, manchineel, meal, misdeal, Neil, O'Neill, ordeal, peal, peel, reel, schlemiel, seal, seel, she'll, spiel, squeal, steal, steel, Steele, teal, underseal, veal, weal, we'll, wheel, zeal •airmobile • Dormobile • snowmobile •Popemobile • bookmobile •automobile • piecemeal •sweetmeal, wheatmeal •fishmeal • inchmeal • cornmeal •wholemeal • bonemeal • oatmeal •kriegspiel • bonspiel • Glockenspiel •newsreel • imbecile • Jugendstil •cartwheel • treadwheel • millwheel •pinwheel • flywheel • gearwheel •waterwheel

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