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dig

dig / dig/ • v. (dig·ging ; past dug / dəg/ ) 1. [intr.] break up and move earth with a tool or machine, or with hands, paws, snout, etc.: the boar had been digging for roots | [tr.] she had to dig the garden | authorities cause chaos by digging up roads. ∎  [tr.] make (a hole, grave, etc.) by breaking up and moving earth in such a way: he took a spade and dug a hole | [as adj.] (dug) the newly dug grave. ∎  [tr.] extract from the ground by breaking up and moving earth: they dug up fossils of an animal about the size of a turkey. ∎  (dig in) (of a soldier) protect oneself by making a trench or similar ground defense. ∎  [in imper.] (dig in) inf. used to encourage someone to start eating with gusto and have as much as they want: put the sausage on top of the polenta; then dig in. ∎  [tr.] (dig something in/into) push or poke something in or into: he dug his hands into his pockets. ∎  [tr.] excavate (an archaeological site): apart from digging a site, recording evidence is important. ∎  [tr.] (dig something out) bring out something that is hidden or has been stored for a long time: they dug out last year's notes. ∎  (dig into) inf. find money from (somewhere): members have to dig deep into their pockets. ∎  [intr.] search or rummage in a specified place: Catherine dug into her handbag and produced her card. ∎  engage in research; conduct an investigation: a professional digging for information | he had no compunction about digging into her private affairs. ∎  [tr.] (dig something up/out) discover information after a search or investigation: have you dug up any information on the captain? 2. [tr.] inf., dated like, appreciate, or understand: I really dig heavy rock. • n. 1. [in sing.] an act or spell of digging: a thorough dig of the whole plot. ∎  an archaeological excavation. 2. a push or poke with one's elbow, finger, etc.: Ginnie gave her sister a dig in the ribs. ∎ inf. a remark intended to mock or criticize: this was a cruel dig at Jenny. PHRASES: dig up dirt inf. discover and reveal damaging information about someone. dig oneself into a hole (or dig a hole for oneself) get oneself into an awkward or restrictive situation. dig in one's heels resist stubbornly; refuse to give in: he has dug in his heels and refuses to leave. dig's one's own grave see grave1 .

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dig

dig XIII. ME. digge, perh. f. OE. *dīċiġian, f. dīċ DITCH. Orig. weak (digged); the new dug appears XVI.

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dig

dig dig oneself into a hole get oneself into an awkward or restrictive situation.
dig in one's heels or toes resist stubbornly.

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dig

digbig, brig, dig, fig, frig, gig, grig, jig, lig, pig, prig, rig, snig, sprig, swig, tig, trig, twig, Whig, wig •Liebig • shindig • whirligig •thingamajig • Pfennig • Gehrig •thimblerig • Meurig • oilrig • Leipzig •Schleswig • bigwig • periwig • Ludwig •earwig • Danzig • Zagazig

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