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chord

chord1 / kôrd/ • n. a group of (typically three or more) notes sounded together, as a basis of harmony: a G major chord. • v. [intr.] [usu. as n.] (chording) play, sing, or arrange notes in chords. DERIVATIVES: chord·al / ˈkôrdl/ adj. chord2 • n. 1. Math. a straight line joining the ends of an arc. ∎  Aeron. the width of an airfoil from leading to trailing edge. ∎  Engineering each of the two principal members of a truss. 2. Anat. variant spelling of cord: spinal chord. 3. poetic/lit. a string on a harp or other instrument. PHRASES: strike (or touch) a chord affect or stir someone's emotions. [ORIGIN: with figurative reference to the emotions being the ‘strings’ of the mind visualized as a musical instrument.]

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chord (in music)

chord, in music, two or more simultaneously sounding pitches. In tonal music the fundamental chord is called the triad. It consists of three pitches, two a perfect fifth apart and a third pitch a major or minor third lower, forming respectively the major or minor triad. However, a triad may instead be diminished or augmented, or may contain dissonant elements such as a seventh. In atonal music, other types of chord formations occur. It is, however, an essential property of a chord that it be conceived as an entity, that its constituent notes "fuse" rather than merely coincide in time.

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chord

chord In music, the simultaneous occurrence of three or more musical tones of different pitch. Chords are categorized as anomalous, characteristic, common, inverted or transient. See also harmony

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