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metre

metre Symbol m. The SI unit of length that is equal to 39.37 inches. It is formally defined as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299 792 458 of a second. This definition, adopted by the General Conference on Weights and Measures in October 1983, replaced the 1960 definition based on the krypton lamp, i.e. 1 650 763.73 wavelengths in a vacuum of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the levels 2p10 and 5d5 of the nuclide krypton-86. This definition replaced the older (1927) definition of a metre based on a platinum-iridium bar of standard length.

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metre

metre. Term used of regular succession of rhythmical impulses, or beats, in poetry and mus., e.g. 3/4 and 6/8 being described as different kinds of metres. Rhythm is no longer accepted as a sufficiently precise definition, metre being considered as the basic pulse and rhythm as the actual time-patterns of the notes within a measure. E.g., in 3/4 the 3 beats—strong, weak, weak—are metrical, while the time-values of the notes actually heard are the rhythm.

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metre

metre In poetry, a regular rhythmic pattern. It imposes a regular recurrence of stresses, typically dividing a line into equal units called metrical feet. The most commonly used metrical feet are anapaest, dactyl, iamb, and trochee. The metre of a poem is described according to the kind and number of metrical feet per line: for example, iambic pentameters have five iambs per line.

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metre

metre1, U.S. meter form of poetic rhythm, metrical form, verse. XIV. — (O)F. mètre — L. metrum — Gr. métron, f. IE. *mḗ- MEASURE + instr. suffix. Also in comps. hexameter, pentameter, etc.
So metrical pert. to metre XV; relating to measurement XVII. — L. metricus — Gr. metrist XVI. — medL. metrista.

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metre

metre (symbol m) SI unit of distance. Conceived as being a ten-millionth of the surface distance between the North Pole and the Equator, it was formerly defined by two marks on a platinum bar kept in Paris. It is now defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum during 1/299,792,458 of a second. One metre equals 39.3701 inches.

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metre

metre2, U. S. meter unit of length of the metric system. XVIII. — F. mètre — Gr. métron (see prec.).
So metric XIX.

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metre

metre (mee-ter) n. the SI unit of length that is equal to 39.37 inches. Symbol: m.

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metre

metrecater, crater, creator, curator, data, debater, delator, dumbwaiter, equator, freighter, frustrater, gaiter, grater, gyrator, hater, later, legator, mater, negator, pater, peseta, plater, rotator, skater, slater, stater, tater, traitor, ultimata, understater, upstater, waiter •painter •taster, waster •gamester • aviator • tailgater •hesitater • shirtwaister •Akita, Anita, arboreta, beater, beta, Bhagavadgita, cheater, cheetah, Demeter, Dieter, dolce vita, eater, eta, Evita, excreta, fetor, granita, greeter, heater, Juanita, litre (US liter), Lolita, maltreater, margarita, meter, metre, Peta, peter, praetor (US pretor), repeater, Rita, saltpetre (US saltpeter), secretor, Senhorita, señorita, Sita, skeeter, teeter, terra incognita, theta, treater, tweeter, ureter, veleta, zeta •Batista, Dniester, Easter, feaster, keister, leister, quaestor •speedster •deemster, teamster •scenester • browbeater • windcheater •beefeater •millilitre (US milliliter) •decilitre (US deciliter) •centilitre (US centiliter) •kilolitre (US kiloliter) •ammeter • Machmeter •millimetre (US millimeter) •decimetre (US decimeter) •altimeter •centimetre (US centimeter) •nanometre (US nanometer) •micrometer, micrometre •decametre (US dekameter) •kilometre (US kilometer) • autopista •anteater

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