Skip to main content
Select Source:

Disaster

183. Disaster (See also Shipwreck.)

  1. Amoco Cadiz oil tanker broke up off Britanny coast; 1.6 million barrels spilled (1978). [Fr. Hist.: Facts (1978), 201, 202]
  2. Angur-boda Utgard giantess, worker of disaster; literally, anguish-boding. [Norse Myth.: Leach, 58]
  3. Chicago fire conflagration destroyed most of city (1871). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 94]
  4. Deluge earth-covering flood that destroyed all but Noahs family and animals in the ark. [O.T.: Genesis 68]
  5. Deucalions Flood the Deluge of Greek legend. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 266]
  6. Evangeline concerns peaceful village vacated and destroyed during war. [Am. Lit.: Evangeline in Magill I, 261263]
  7. Fatal Vespers 2 Jesuits and 100 others killed in collapse of lecture hall. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1127]
  8. Gilgamesh epic Babylonian legend contains pre-Biblical ac-count of Flood. [Near East. Myth.: EB, IV: 542]
  9. Hindenburg, the German airship blew up upon mooring in New Jersey (1937). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 43]
  10. Johnstown Flood Pennsylvania city destroyed by flood (May 31, 1889); 2,200 lives lost. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1427]
  11. Lusitania British luxury liner sunk by German submarine in World War I. [Br. Hist.: EB (1963) XX, 518]
  12. Pompeii Roman city buried by eruption of Mt. Vesuvius (79). [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 2187]
  13. red cloud indicates disaster is impending. [Eastern Folklore: Jobes, 350]
  14. San Francisco earthquake disaster claiming many lives and most of city (1906). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 443444]
  15. Titanic British passenger ship sinks on maiden voyage (1912). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 2753]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Disaster." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Disaster." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster

"Disaster." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Retrieved February 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

disaster

dis·as·ter / diˈzastər/ • n. a sudden event, such as an accident or a natural catastrophe, that causes great damage or loss of life: 159 people died in the disaster | disaster struck within minutes of takeoff. ∎  [as adj.] denoting a genre of films that use natural or accidental catastrophe as the mainspring of plot and setting: a disaster movie. ∎  an event or fact that has unfortunate consequences: a string of personal disasters | reduced legal aid could spell financial disaster. ∎ inf. a person, act, or thing that is a failure: my perm is a total disaster. PHRASES: be a recipe for disaster be extremely likely to have unfortunate consequences: sky-high interest rates are a recipe for disaster.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"disaster." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"disaster." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster

"disaster." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved February 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

disaster

disaster XVI. — F. désastre or its source It. disastro, f. dis- DIS- 2 + astro (:- L. astrum) STAR; lit. ‘unfavourable aspect of a star’.
So disastrous †ill-starred, ill-boding XVI; calamitous XVII. — F. désastreux — It. disastroso.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"disaster." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"disaster." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster-0

"disaster." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved February 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disaster-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.