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indent

in·dent1 • v. / inˈdent/ [tr.] 1. start (a line of text) or position (a block of text, table, etc.) further from the margin than the main part of the text. 2. (usu. be indented) form deep recesses in (a line or surface): a coastline indented by many fjords. ∎  make toothlike notches in: it has rounded leaves indented at the tip. 3. hist. divide (a document drawn up in duplicate) into its two copies with a zigzag line, thus ensuring identification. ∎  draw up (a legal document) in exact duplicate. • n. / inˈdent; ˈinˌdent/ 1. a space left by indenting a line or block of text. 2. an indentation: every indent in the coastline. 3. an indenture. DERIVATIVES: in·den·tor / -tər/ n. in·dent2 • v. [tr.] make a dent or depression in (something): his chin was firm and slightly indented. ∎  impress (a mark) on something.

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indent

indent make tooth-like incision in, spec. for the purpose of an INDENTURE XIV; make a convenant XV; †contract for XVI; engage (a servant) by contract, orig. in U.S. and Anglo-Indian use XVIII; make a requisition for, draw upon XIX; (typogr.) set back from the margin XVII. — AN. endenter, AL. indentāre, f. IN1 + dēns, dent- TOOTH.
So indenture deed with mutual convenants executed in two or more copies, all having their edges correspondingly indented XIV; indentation XVII. Earliest in MSc. en-, indenture — AN. endenture (OF. -eure), medL. indentūra (also indentātūra), f. indentātus, pp. of indentāre. Hence as vb. XVII.

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indent

indent. Shape cut out in a stone slab to receive brass or latten inlaid work, such as an effigy or inscription.

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