flamboyant

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flam·boy·ant1 / flamˈboiənt/ • adj. 1. (of a person or their behavior) tending to attract attention because of their exuberance, confidence, and stylishness: a flamboyant display of aerobatics she is outgoing and flamboyant, continuously talking and joking. ∎  (esp. of clothing) noticeable because brightly colored, highly patterned, or unusual in style.2. Archit. of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flamelike tracery and ornate decoration.DERIVATIVES: flam·boy·ance n.flam·boy·an·cy / -ˈboiənsē/ n.flam·boy·ant·ly adv.flam·boy·ant2 • n. another term for royal poinciana (see poinciana).

Flamboyant

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Flamboyant. Late style of Continental Gothic (c.1375–mid-C16) that evolved from Second Pointed Curvilinear work, especially the flowing forms of the tracery: it gets its name from the flame-like shapes bounded by the curved bars. In France its most outstanding manifestations were at the west porch of St-Maclou, Rouen (c.1500–14), and the west front of Troyes Cathedral (early C16) by Chambiges. Flamboyant tracery occurs elsewhere, including the British Isles (e.g. west window of York Minster).

flamboyant style

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flamboyant style Final phase of French Gothic architecture (14th–16th century). The name comes from the flame-like forms of the elaborate tracery used in cathedrals, as on the west façade of Rouen Cathedral (1370). The English Decorated style is a close equivalent.

flamboyant

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flamboyant (orig. archit.) characterized by waved flame-like forms; flamingly coloured. XIX. — F., prp. of flamboyer, f. flambe; see prec.

flamboyant

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flamboyant of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flamelike tracery and ornate decoration.