coup

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coup / koō/ • n. (pl. coups / koōz/ ) 1. (also coup d'é·tat) a sudden, violent, and illegal seizure of power from a government. 2. a notable or successful stroke or move. ∎  an unusual or unexpected but successful tactic in card play. 3. hist. (among North American Indians) an act of touching an armed enemy in battle as a deed of bravery, or an act of first touching an item of the enemy's in order to claim it.

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coup (kōō) [Fr.,=blow], among Native North Americans of the Plains culture, a war honor, awarded for striking an enemy in such a way that it was considered an extreme act of bravery. Generally, coups were awarded according to the degree of difficulty and danger involved; the most extreme, such as striking an armed enemy with the bare hand, counted highest. Killing an enemy, wounding him, scalping him, or stealing his horse or gun—all these were coups of value. Recital of the deeds was an important social function, and a warrior with many coups held a high status and was honored at feasts, ceremonials, and in the tribe. After warfare had ceased, coups became transferable property, passing from the old men to the younger, who needed coups to acquire warrior status in the tribe.

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coup XVIII. — F. (see COPE 2).