Skip to main content
Select Source:

Dunbar, battle of

Dunbar, battle of, 1650. Dunbar was Cromwell's greatest victory, won against severe odds. After the execution of his father, Charles II's hopes rested with his supporters in Scotland, and he arrived there in July 1650. Cromwell followed him three weeks later, advancing up the east coast from Berwick. The royalist army was led by David Leslie, who had fought alongside Cromwell at Marston Moor. On 2 September Cromwell's army, weakened by sickness, was bottled up at Dunbar, Leslie, with twice his numbers, having cut off his retreat. Evacuation by sea appeared the wisest move. Cromwell chose to attack the following day and, with very light casualties, destroyed Leslie's force, taking 10,000 prisoners—almost the size of his own army. ‘God made them as stubble to our swords,’ Cromwell reported to Parliament.

J. A. Cannon

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 14, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dunbar-battle-0

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved February 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dunbar-battle-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Dunbar, battle of

Dunbar, battle of, 1296. In 1292 Edward I found in favour of the claim of John Balliol as king of Scotland. Three years later, relations between the two had broken down and Balliol formed an alliance with France. In the spring of 1296 Edward invaded and captured Berwick. Moving up the coast he laid siege to Dunbar. A relieving army was defeated on 27 April by John de Warenne and the castle capitulated. Edward then proclaimed himself king of Scotland, called a Scottish Parliament at Berwick, and removed the stone of Scone to England.

J. A. Cannon

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 14, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dunbar-battle

"Dunbar, battle of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved February 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dunbar-battle

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.