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Manilow, Barry (1946–)

Barry Manilow (1946–)



In the 1970s, Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus) became popular for his melodic romantic songs and intimate singing style. "Serious" music critics mocked him for his audience of middle-aged women. His boy-next-door appearance made him the target of cruel jokes. But Manilow sold records by the millions. Songs such as "Mandy" and "Copacabana" had huge chart success. Never exactly a groundbreaking artist, Manilow always entertained his loyal audience with easy-listening romantic pop.

After attending the New York College of Music and the Juilliard School in the 1960s, Brooklyn-born Manilow proved himself an all-round music professional. He began his career as a composer and arranger of commercials for such products as Dr. Pepper and Band-Aid and also sang on Broadway (see entry under 1900s—Film and Theater in volume 1). Since the height of his fame in the late 1970s and early 1980s, he has concentrated on his great passion, the show tunes of the 1930s and 1940s.


—Chris Routledge


For More Information

Barry Net: The Official Site of the Barry Manilow International Fan Club.http://www.barrynet.com (accessed March 26, 2002).

Peters, Richard. Barry Manilow: An Illustrated Biography. New York: Delilah Books, 1983.

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