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stibnite

stibnite (stĬb´nīt), antimony sulfide, Sb2S3, a mineral, silvery gray in color, with a metallic luster. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system. Found in many parts of the world, it is the most important ore of antimony. It is commonly deposited by alkaline waters and occurs in association with quartz, calcite, sulfides of the base metals, arsenic, gold, and silver. Known in ancient times, stibnite was used in powdered form by women to darken their eyebrows and eyelashes. Antimony is used in alloys for type metal, storage batteries, pewter, babbitt, and antifriction metal for bearings. Its compounds find use in explosives, matches, and fireworks, in vulcanizing rubber, and in medicine as an emetic.

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stibnite

stibnite (antimonite, antimony glance) One of the main ore minerals for antimony, with the formula Sb2S3; sp. gr. 4.6; hardness 2.0–2.5; orthorhombic; normally lead-grey with a bluish tarnish; metallic lustre; crystals prismatic, columnar, acicular, and vertically striated; perfect lengthwise cleavage {010}, imperfect {100}, {110}; occurs mainly in hydrothermal deposits, at the lowtemperature end, often forming sheet-like bodies, associated with fluorite, quartz, and barite, and with sulphides of lead, zinc, and other metals.

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