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sin·gle / ˈsinggəl/ • adj. 1. only one; not one of several: a single red rose | the kingdom was ruled over by a single family. ∎  regarded separately or as distinct from each other or others in a group: she wrote down every single word it’s our single most popular beach. ∎  even one (used for emphasis): they didn't receive a single reply. ∎  designed or suitable for one person: a single bed. ∎ archaic not accompanied or supported by others; alone. 2. unmarried or not involved in a stable sexual relationship: a single mother. 3. consisting of one part: the studio was a single large room. ∎  (of a flower) having only one whorl of petals. ∎  denoting an alcoholic drink that consists of one measure of liquor: a single whiskey. 4. archaic free from duplicity or deceit; ingenuous: a pure and single heart. • n. 1. an individual person or thing rather than part of a pair or a group. ∎  a short record with one song on each side. ∎  (singles) people who are unmarried or not involved in a stable sexual relationship: [as adj.] a singles bar. ∎  a bedroom, esp. in a hotel, that is suitable for one person. ∎  a single measure of liquor. ∎ inf. a one-dollar bill. 2. Baseball a hit that allows the batter to reach first base safely. 3. (singles) (esp. in tennis and badminton) a game or competition for individual players, not pairs or teams. • v. [tr.] 1. (single someone/something out) choose someone or something from a group for special treatment: one newspaper was singled out for criticism. 2. [intr.] Baseball hit a single: Aaron singled to center. ∎  (single in) [tr.] cause (a run) to be scored by hitting a single: they each singled in a run. ∎  [tr.] advance (a runner) by hitting a single. DERIVATIVES: sin·gle·ness n. sin·gly / -glē/ adv.

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"single." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"single." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/single-0

"single." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/single-0

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single

single unaccompanied; unmarried; individual; not double XIV; separate XV; one (one or a) only XVI. ME. sengle — OF. sengle, single :- L. singulus f. sim- as in SIMPLE.
Hence single vb. separate, pick out. XVI. singlet (-ET) unlined undergarment for the trunk. XVIII. singleton (-TON) a single card of a suit in the hand. XIX. singly (-LY2) XIII.

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"single." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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single

single To reduce the regrowth from a coppice stool to allow a single pole to grow on to form a standard tree.

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"single." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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single

single (store) To allow a single pole from a coppice stool to grow on to form a standard tree.

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"single." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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single

singledraggle, gaggle, haggle, raggle-taggle, straggle, waggle •algal •angle, bangle, bespangle, dangle, entangle, fandangle, jangle, mangel, mangle, spangle, strangle, tangle, wangle, wide-angle, wrangle •triangle • quadrangle • rectangle •pentangle • right angle • gargle •bagel, finagle, Hegel, inveigle, Schlegel •beagle, eagle, illegal, legal, paralegal, regal, spread eagle, viceregal •porbeagle •giggle, higgle, jiggle, niggle, sniggle, squiggle, wiggle, wriggle •commingle, cringle, dingle, Fingal, intermingle, jingle, mingle, shingle, single, swingle, tingle •prodigal • madrigal • warrigal •surcingle • Christingle •boggle, goggle, joggle, synagogal, toggle, woggle •diphthongal, Mongol, pongal •hornswoggle •bogle, mogul, ogle •Bruegel •bugle, frugal, fugal, google •Dougal, Mughal •Portugal • conjugal •juggle, smuggle, snuggle, struggle •bungle, fungal, jungle •McGonagall • astragal •burghal, burgle, Fergal, gurgle

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