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simple

sim·ple / ˈsimpəl/ • adj. (-pler , -plest ) 1. easily understood or done; presenting no difficulty: a simple solution camcorders are now so simple to operate. ∎  plain, basic, or uncomplicated in form, nature, or design; without much decoration or ornamentation: a simple white blouse the house is furnished in a simple country style. ∎  used to emphasize the fundamental and straightforward nature of something: the simple truth. 2. composed of a single element; not compound. ∎  Math. denoting a group that has no proper normal subgroup. ∎  Bot. (of a leaf or stem) not divided or branched. ∎  (of a lens, microscope, etc.) consisting of a single lens or component. ∎  (in English grammar) denoting a tense formed without an auxiliary, e.g., sang as opposed to was singing. ∎  (of interest) payable on the sum loaned only. Compare with compound1 . 3. of or characteristic of low rank or status; humble and unpretentious: a simple Buddhist monk. 4. of low or abnormally low intelligence. • n. chiefly hist. a medicinal herb, or a medicine made from one: the gatherers of simples. DERIVATIVES: sim·ple·ness n.

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simple

simple
A. free from duplicity; free from pride XIII;

B. of humble condition; ordinary, homely XIII; deficient in knowledge XIV; silly XVII;

C. with nothing added XIV; not complex XV;

D. sb. pl. persons of humble status; unlettered people XIV; sg. (gram.) simplex; (arch.) uncompounded substance, herb for use as such XVI. — (O)F. — L. simplus, corr. to Gr. haplǒos, f. IE. *sm- *sem- *som- (cf. SAME) + *pl-, as in duplus DOUBLE, triplus TRIPLE, etc.
Hence simply XIII. So simplex consisting of a single part XVI; sb. (gram.) uncompounded word XIX. — L., with second el. as in duplex, multiplex, -plic- (see PLY1). simplicity XIV. — (O)F. or L., f. simplex, -plic- simplify XVII. — F. medL. simplification XVII.

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Simple

SIMPLE

Unmixed; not aggravated or compounded.

A simple assault, for example, is one that is not accompanied by any circumstances of aggravation, such as assault with a deadly weapon.

Simple interest is a fixed amount paid in exchange for a sum of money lent. The interest generated on the amount borrowed does not itself earn interest, unlike interest earned where parties agree to compound interest.

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simple

simple Of a leaf, not lobed or divided. Compare COMPOUND.

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simple

simpleapple, chapel, chappal, Chappell, dapple, grapple, scrapple •scalpel •ample, trample •pineapple •carpal, carpel •example, sample •sepal •stemple, temple •maple, papal, staple •peepul, people, steeple •tradespeople • sportspeople •townspeople • workpeople •cripple, fipple, nipple, ripple, stipple, tipple, triple •dimple, pimple, simple, wimple •Oedipal • maniple • manciple •municipal •principal, principle •participle • multiple •archetypal, disciple, typal •prototypal •hopple, popple, stopple, topple •gospel •Constantinople, copal, nopal, opal, Opel •duple, pupal, pupil, scruple •quadruple • septuple • sextuple •quintuple • octuple •couple, supple •crumple, rumple, scrumple •syncopal • episcopal • purple

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