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degenerate

de·gen·er·ate • adj. / diˈjenərit/ 1. having lost the physical, mental, or moral qualities considered normal and desirable; showing evidence of decline. 2. lacking some property, order, or distinctness of structure previously or usually present, in particular: ∎  Math. relating to or denoting an example of a particular type of equation, curve, or other entity that is equivalent to a simpler type, often occurring when a variable or parameter is set to zero. ∎  Physics relating to or denoting an energy level that corresponds to more than one quantum state. ∎  Physics relating to or denoting matter at densities so high that gravitational contraction is counteracted either by the Pauli exclusion principle or by an analogous quantum effect between closely packed neutrons. ∎  Biol. having reverted to a simpler form as a result of losing a complex or adaptive structure present in the ancestral form. • n. / diˈjenərit/ an immoral or corrupt person. • v. / diˈjenəˌrāt/ [intr.] decline or deteriorate physically, mentally, or morally. DERIVATIVES: de·gen·er·a·cy / -rəsē/ n. de·gen·er·ate·ly / -ritlē/ adv.

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degenerate

degenerate that has declined in character or qualities. XV. — L. dēgenerātus, pp. of dēgenerāre depart from its race or kind, f. dēgener debased, ignoble, f. DE- 2 + genus, gener- KIND 1.
So degenerate vb. become degenerate. XVI. f. pp. stem of the L. vb.; see -ATE 2, -ATE 3. degeneration XVII. — F.

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degenerate

degenerate Applied to parts of the body, or stages in the life cycle of an organism, which have become greatly reduced in size, or have disappeared entirely, in the course of evolution.

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degenerate

degenerate Applied to parts of the body, or stages in the life cycle of an organism, that have become greatly reduced in size, or have disappeared entirely, in the course of evolution.

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degenerate

degenerate •gamut •imamate, marmot •animate •approximate, proximate •estimate, guesstimate, underestimate •illegitimate, legitimate •intimate •penultimate, ultimate •primate • foumart • consummate •Dermot •discarnate, incarnate •impregnate • rabbinate •coordinate, inordinate, subordinate, superordinate •infinite • laminate • effeminate •discriminate • innominate •determinate • Palatinate • pectinate •obstinate • agglutinate • designate •tribunate • importunate • Arbuthnot •bicarbonate • umbonate • fortunate •pulmonate •compassionate, passionate •affectionate •extortionate, proportionate •sultanate • companionate •principate • Rupert • episcopate •carat, carrot, claret, garret, karat, parrot •emirate • aspirate • vertebrate •levirate •duumvirate, triumvirate •pirate • quadrat • accurate • indurate •obdurate •Meerut, vizierate •priorate • curate • elaborate •deliberate • confederate •considerate, desiderate •immoderate, moderate •ephorate •imperforate, perforate •agglomerate, conglomerate •numerate •degenerate, regenerate •separate • temperate • desperate •disparate • corporate • professorate •commensurate • pastorate •inveterate •directorate, electorate, inspectorate, protectorate, rectorate •illiterate, literate, presbyterate •doctorate • Don Quixote • marquisate •concert • cushat • precipitate

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