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electrostatic printer

electrostatic printer A type of printer (no longer in widespread use) in which the required image is first written as a pattern of electrostatic charge, and is then made visible by bringing the pattern into contact with particles of pigment that carry a charge of opposite polarity. The pigment is only attracted to the charge pattern and is subsequently fused or bonded to the paper.

In some designs the charge pattern is applied by styluses directly to paper that has been specially treated. An alternative approach is to apply the pattern to a metal drum with a suitable coating such as aluminum oxide. The pattern is made visible by washing the paper or drum with a colloidal suspension of charged particles of pigment. The image on a drum is transferred to plain paper by pressure and the application of an electric field. The particles of pigment are very fine and thus penetrate the fibers of the paper and form a permanent image. The charge can also be applied to the drum by the controlled projection of ions.

In some literature the term is used to refer to all printers in which an electrostatic image is formed as one of the steps in the process, including electrophotographic printers.

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