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Chapman, Jane 1970-

Chapman, Jane 1970-

(Jack Tickle)

Personal

Born September 26, 1970, in Plymouth, England; daughter of Chris (a banker) and Marion (a homemaker) Chapman; married Tim Warnes (an illustrator), April 16, 1994; children: Noah. Education: Attended Redruth Comprehensive and Yeovil Art College; Brighton University, B.A. (graphic design II, first class). Religion: Christian. Hobbies and other interests: Quilting, embroidery, patchwork, cinema.

Addresses

Home—Somerset, England.

Career

Author and illustrator, 1995—. Worked as a portrait painter, 1995-96; soft-toy designer for Russ Berrie, 1995-97.

Awards, Honors

Times Educational Supplement junior information award, 1999, for The Emperor's Egg.

Writings

FOR CHILDREN; SELF-ILLUSTRATED

Peter and Pickle's Puzzling Presents, Magi (London, England), 1995.

Mary's Baby, Artists & Writers Guild Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Hye Diddle, Diddle, and Other Nursery Rhymes, Walker/Early Learning Centre (London, England), 1997.

The Three Little Pigs, and Other Nursery Tales, Walker/Early Learning Centre (London, England), 1997.

Old MacDonald Had a Farm, edited by Gale Pryor, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1999.

We Went to Visit a Farm One Day, Walker/Early Learning Centre (London, England), 1999.

Let's Go! (board book), Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2003.

Let's Build! (board book), Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2003.

Sing a Song of Sixpence: A Pocketful of Nursery Rhymes and Tales, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2004.

ILLUSTRATOR

A.H. Benjamin, What If?, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1996, published as Baa, Moo: What Will We Do?, Little Tiger Press (London, England), 2003.

Susan Akass, Grizzly Bears, ABC, 1996.

Julie Sykes, Dora's Eggs, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1997.

Linda Jennings, Penny and Pup, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1997.

Tony Mitton, Where's My Egg?, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1998.

Phyllis Root, One Duck Stuck, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1998.

Caroline Pitcher, Don't Be Afraid, Little Foal, Magi (London, England), 1998.

Caroline Pitcher, Run with the Wind, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1998.

Vivian French, The Story of Christmas, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1999.

Julie Sykes, Smudge, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1999.

Martin Jenkins, The Emperor's Egg, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1999.

Diana Hendry, The Very Noisy Night, Dutton (New York, NY), 1999.

Vivian French, Noah's Ark, and Other Bible Stories, Walker/Early Learning Centre (London, England), 2000.

Linda Cornwell, Two Hungry Bears, NP, 2000.

Nicola Davies, One Tiny Turtle, Walker (London, England), 2000, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2001.

Karma Wilson, Bear Snores On, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2000, board-book edition, 2005.

David Bedford, Touch the Sky, My Little Bear, Handprint Books (Brooklyn, NY), 2001.

Diana Hendry, The Very Busy Day, Little Tiger (London, England), 2001.

Julie Sykes, Dora's Chicks, Tiger Tales (Wilton, CT), 2002.

Peter Kavanagh, Love like This, Little Tiger Press (London, England), 2002.

Peter Kavanagh, I Love My Mama, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2003.

Karma Wilson, Bear Wants More, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Claire Freedman, Dilly Duckling, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Nick Dowson, Tigress, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2004.

Karma Wilson, Bear Stays up for Christmas, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Diana Hendry, The Very Snowy Christmas, Tiger Tales (Wilton, CT), 2005.

Karma Wilson, Mortimer's Christmas Manger, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2005.

Tim Warnes, Mommy Mine, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 2005.

Sally Lloyd Jones, Time to Say Goodnight, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 2006.

Karma Wilson, Bear's New Friend, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2006.

Karma Wilson, Bear Feels Sick, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2007.

Tim Warnes, Daddy Hug, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 2007.

Karma Wilson, Where Is Home, Little Pip?, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2008.

ILLUSTRATOR; "HAPPY HONEY" BEGINNING READERS

Laura Godwin, Happy and Honey, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Laura Godwin, Honey Helps, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Laura Godwin, The Best Fall of All, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Laura Godwin, Happy Christmas, Honey!, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2002.

ILLUSTRATOR; UNDER PSEUDONYM JACK TICKLE

Isobel Finn, The Very Lazy Ladybird, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 1999.

Sheridan Cain, The Crunching, Munching Caterpillar, Little Tiger Press (Wauwatosa, WI), 2000.

Julie Sykes, Little Rocket's Special Star, Little Tiger (London, England), 2000.

Andrew Murray, The Very Sleepy Sloth, Little Tiger (London, England), 2003.

Sam Lloyd, Yummy Yummy Food for My Tummy!, Little Tiger (London, England), 2003.

Sheridan Cain, The Teeny Weeny Tadpole, Little Tiger (London, England), 2005.

ILLUSTRATOR; POP-UP BOOKS; UNDER PSEUDONYM JACK TICKLE

The Very Lazy Lion, Little Tiger (London, England), 2004.

The Very Bouncy Bear, Little Tiger (London, England), 2004.

The Very Happy Hen, Little Tiger (London, England), 2004.

The Very Silly Shark, Little Tiger (London, England), 2004.

The Very Clever Crocodile, Little Tiger (London, England), 2006.

The Very Friendly Firefly, Little Tiger (London, England), 2006.

The Very Smiley Snowman, Little Tiger (London, England), 2006.

Adaptations

One Duck Stuck was adapted as an animated segment of the BBC television program Words and Pictures. Several books featuring Chapman's illustrations have been paired with audiocassettes, among them The Crunching Munching Caterpillar, Little Tiger, 2005.

Sidelights

A prolific illustrator, British artist Jane Chapman shares her gift for creating engaging animal characters in the pages of picture books such as Tony Mitton's Where's My Egg?, Nick Dowson's Tigress, Martin Jenkins' award-winning The Emperor's Egg, and Karma Wilson's popular Bear Snores On and its sequels. "I've always loved working in acrylic paint," Chapman once explained to SATA, noting that "sometimes I whack it on thickly with lots of textured brushstrokes." Chapman's love of painting is matched by her expertise; her work features bright colors balanced by realistic details, her use of subtle variations in color both complementing and adding to the storyline she is illustrating. While much of her work features cuddly animals with human attributes, Chapman's work for Tigress showcases her versatility. In reviewing the book, which introduces young readers to the growth of a tiger cub, a Publishers Weekly contributor noted that "Chapman delivers lifelike, closely focused renderings" of the mother tiger and her growing offspring, and Booklist reviewer Hazel Rochman cited the illustrator's ability to capture a mother's gentle nurturing in her "bright, clear, double-page acrylic pictures."

Born in Plymouth, England, and raised in a middle-class English family, Chapman graduated from Brighton University with a degree in graphic design, having specialized in illustration. Although she began her career as a portrait painter, she soon realized that she would have to change track. As Chapman recalled to SATA, "Although my work was commercial, I was never going to be anything other than a penniless artist unless I got some royalties coming in!" Chapman decided to follow in the footsteps of her husband, fellow artist Tim Warnes, and follow a new career path as a children's book illustrator.

One of Chapman's first illustration projects was the picture book Mary's Baby, which features an original story telling the tale of Christ's birth. Jane Marino, reviewing the work for School Library Journal, commented that Chapman's "controlled vocabulary and short sentences" pair with her "round, childlike figures, with button eyes and little black circles for mouths" to "emphasize the simplicity of the story."

While Chapman has produced several more original self-illustrated picture books, and has illustrated traditional rhymes and stories in Sing a Song of Sixpence: A Pocketful of Nursery Rhymes and Tales and Old Macdonald Had a Farm, the bulk of her work has been dedicated to creating artwork for texts written by other writers. In her work for Julie Sykes' Dora's Eggs and Dora's Chicks, about a mother hen focused on raising a family, Chapman was praised for her use of bold yet simple forms, which convey a harmonious impression and a sense of trust. Jane Doonan, writing in School Librarian, took particular note of the illustrator's use of colors and "nuances of textures" in Dora's Eggs, while

[Image not available for copyright reasons]

in School Library Journal Marlene Gawron deemed the illustrations for Dora's Chicks "large and bright." A Publishers Weekly reviewer, commenting on Chapman's work for Phyllis Root's One Duck Stuck, noted that "the illustrator revels in juxtaposing strong colors," an assessment the artist would approve of. In fact, Chapman likes to use strong, contemporary colors so that her books have a current feel about them, thus making them appealing to her young audience.

In 1999 Chapman joined author Martin Jenkins in receiving a Times Educational Supplement Junior Information Award for her work on The Emperor's Egg. The picture book features artwork that "balances realistic details with the penguin's implicit charm," according to a Publishers Weekly reviewer. The same critic credited Chapman with providing "naturalistic acrylics of the frozen environment, against cold violet or warm orange backdrops," and Diana Hinds praised Chapman's rendition of the penguins as "engaging and characterful without being in the least cute" in her assessment of The Emperor's Egg for the Times Educational Supplement.

In addition to strong color, Chapman emphasizes texture in her art. Her illustrations for The Very Noisy Night and The Very Busy Day add a new dimension to Diana Hendry's stories by detailing every aspect of the book's setting and integrating these details into the world of Hendry's two mouse protagonists. Thread spools become tables and playing cards are used as beds in the miniature world she creates; postage-stamp pictures, matchbox dresser drawers with button handles,

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and birthday cake candles for bedside lights spark the imagination of young readers and reveal new discoveries upon each successive page-turning. In a review of The Very Busy Day, School Library Journal contributor Linda M. Kenton cited Chapman's art as "innovative and inviting," adding that "it is delightful to examine how resourceful these mice are" in finding new uses for common household objects. In Booklist Helen Rosenberg agreed, writing that the book's "bold, colorful paintings contain clever details that will delight youngsters."

Because animal characters are a staple of picture books for young children, Chapman has had the opportunity to bring to life characters created by a number of writers, among them Phyllis Root, Nick Dowson, Karma Wilson, Laura Godwin, and even her husband, Tim Warnes, with whom she created Mommy Mine and Daddy Hug. Calling Mommy Mine "a salute to mothers of all types," a Kirkus Reviews writer added that as Warnes ranges in focus from insect mothers to giraffes to humans, Chapman brings to life each mother with affection and a "spirit of whimsy."

A creative collaboration that has yielded particular riches has been Chapman's work with Karma Wilson. The popularity of their first book, Bear Snores On, has inspired several more volumes featuring the good-natured brown bear and his affectionate and fun-loving forest friends. In Bear Snores On a brown bear, sleeping snugly in his cave during a winter snowstorm, is quietly joined by Mouse. The small fire Mouse lights attracts the notice of other chilly animals, and soon Squirrel, Hare, Gopher, Raven, and have crowded into the toasty-warm cave, sharing snacks and stories. Finally, Bear is awakened from his sleep, but the good-natured creature quickly forgives his friends for interrupting his winter nap. Chapman's "delightful illustrations … depicting the animals' party are the perfect accompaniment to [Wilson's] … lyrical text," wrote a Kirkus Reviews writer of Bear Snores On, Heather E. Miller adding in School Library Journal that the artist's renderings of the story's animal characters are "infused with warmth and humor." Other books in the series include Bear Stays up for Christmas, Bear's New Friend, and Bear Wants More, the last which takes place in spring and finds the friends of the newly awoken bear scurrying around as they arrange a post-hibernation feast for their famished friend. "Bear is rendered as appealing as ever," noted a Kirkus Reviews writer of the title character in Bear Wants More, adding that "this lovable lump of soft brown fur is as cozy and comforting as a well-loved teddy."

Discussing her work habits on the Walker Books Web site, Chapman explained: "I like to draw and organize roughs in the winter, when the light is bad, and paint all through the summer. I work in acrylic paint, which has been the only medium for me, since I was introduced to it by an art teacher at school. The good thing about acrylic is that you can paint over your mistakes, wiping them clean." The illustrator, who sometimes uses the pseudonym Jack Tickle when publishing her work, once told SATA that, "in terms of inspiration, I find my husband a great model! He spends so much time on the research and rough stage perfecting every little detail, that I feel shamed into trying to follow suit!" The illustrator added that "although this career wasn't my first choice when I first left college it certainly is now…. Now I'm happy to say that I wouldn't do anything else."

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

Booklist, December 1, 1999, Marta Segal, review of The Very Noisy Night, p. 711; January 1, 2000, Linda Perkins, review of The Emperor's Egg, p. 932; November 1, 2002, Ilene Cooper, review of Happy Christmas, Honey!, p. 507; December 1, 2002, Ilene Cooper, review of Happy and Honey, p. 97; April 15, 2001, Amy Brandt, review of Touch the Sky, My Little Bear, p. 1563; December 1, 2001, Hazel Rochman, review of One Tiny Turtle, p. 656; January 1, 2002, Ellen Mandel, review of Bear Snores On, p. 868; February 15, 2002, Helen Rosenberg, review of The Very Busy Day, p. 1019; December 1, 2002, Kathy Broderick, review of The Best Fall of All, p. 674; February 15, 2003, Helen Rosenberg, review of The Very Busy Day, p. 1019; April 15, 2003, Connie Fletcher, review of Bear Wants More, p. 1479; March 1, 2004, Ilene Cooper, review of Dilly Duckling, p. 1194; September 1, 2004, Hazel Rochman, review of Sing a Song of Sixpence:: A Pocketful of Nursery Rhymes and Tales, p. 126; May 15, 2005, Hazel Rochman, review of Mommy Mine, p. 1667; June 1, 2004, Hazel Rochman, review of Tigress, p. 1740; February 1, 2006, Karin Snelson, review of Time to Say Goodnight, p. 56.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, November, 2001, review of One Tiny Turtle, p. 99; March, 2003, review of Bear Wants More, p. 294; July-August, 2004, Hope Morrison, review of Tigress, p. 460.

Guardian Education, August 31, 1999, Vivian French, review of The Very Noisy Night, p. 5.

Horn Book, July-August, 2004, Margaret A. Bush, review of Tigress, p. 466.

Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2001, review of One Tiny Turtle, p. 1210; November 15, 2001, review of Bear Snores On, p. 1616; November 1, 2002, review of Happy Christmas, Honey!, p. 1618; December 1, 2002, review of Bear Wants More, p. 1776; March 1, 2003, review of I Love My Mama, p. 389; December 15, 2003, review of Dilly Duckling, p. 1450; Nay 15, 2004, review of Tigress, p. 490; July 1, 2004, review of Sing a Song of Sixpence, p. 626; November 1, 2004, review of Bear Stays up for Christmas, p. 1055; February 15, 2005, review of Mommy Mine, p. 237; November 1, 2005, review of Mortimer's Christmas Manger, p. 1197; February 15, 2006, review of Time to Say Goodnight, p. 186.

Publishers Weekly, September 18, 1995, review of Mary's Baby, p. 98; May 4, 1998, review of One Duck Stuck, p. 211; November 15, 1999, review of The Emperor's Egg, p. 65; November 15, 1999, review of The Very Noisy Night, p. 64; October 9, 2000, review of Honey Helps, p. 86; November 26, 2001, review of Bear Snores On, p. 60; September 23, 2002, review of Happy Christmas, Honey!, p. 39; September 30, 2002, review of The Emperor's Egg, p. 75; January 20, 2003, review of I Love My Mama, p. 80; January 26, 2004, review of Dilly Duckling, p. 252; July 5, 2004, review of Tigress, p. 55; September 17, 2004, review of Bear Stays up for Christmas, p. 61; September 26, 2005, review of Mortimer's Christmas Manger, p. 86.

School Librarian, August, 1997, Jane Doonan, review of Dora's Eggs, p. 134; winter, 1999, Lucinda Jacob, review of The Very Noisy Night.

School Library Journal, October, 1995, Jane Marino, review of Mary's Baby, p. 36; September, 1998, Heide Piehler, review of Run with the Wind, p. 179; November, 1999, Robin L. Gibson, review of The Very Noisy Night; December, 2000, Wendy S. Carroll, reviews of Happy and Honey and Honey Helps, p. 108; May, 2001, Linda M. Kenton, review of Touch the Sky, My Little Bear, p. 109; December, 2001, Margaret Bush, review of One Tiny Turtle, p. 120; January, 2002, Heather E. Miller, review of Bear Snores On, p. 114; March, 2002, Linda M. Kenton, review of The Very Busy Day, p. 189; July, 2002, Marlene Gawron, review of Dora's Chicks, p. 100; October, 2002, Mara Alpert, review of Happy Christmas, Honey!, p. 59, and Pamela K. Bomboy, review of The Best Fall of All, p. 111; February, 2003, Amy Lilien-Harper, review of Bear Wants More, p. 124; April, 2003, Lisa Gangemi Kropp, review of I Love My Mama, p. 129; April, 2004, Judith Constantinides, review of Dilly Duckling, p. 110; July, 2004, Patricia Manning, review of Tigress, p. 69; October, 2004, Jane Marino, review of Sing a Song of Sixpence, p. 139; July, 2005, Linda M. Kenton, review of Mommy Mine, p. 84; March, 2006, Robin L. Gibson, review of Time to Say Goodnight, p. 196; July, 2006, Julie Roach, review of Bear's New Friend, p. 90.

Times Educational Supplement, March 10, 2000, Diana Hinds, review of The Emperor's Egg.

ONLINE

Walker Books Web site,http://www.walkerbooks.co.uk/ (January 15, 2007), "Jane Chapman."

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