Zweig, David 1950-

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ZWEIG, David 1950-

PERSONAL: Born November 30, 1950, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; son of Robert Isaac (a manufacturer) and Belma Speigal (a manufacturer; maiden name, Jacobson) Zweig; married Joy Poretzky (a merchandiser), May 4, 1992; children: Rachel Ilana. Education: York University, B.A. (with honors), 1972, M.A., 1974; Beijing Language and Culture University (formerly Beijing Languages Institute), certificate in Mandarin Chinese, 1975; Beijing University, certificate in philosophy, 1976; University of Michigan, Ph.D., 1983.

ADDRESSES: Offıce—Division of Social Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong. E-mail— [email protected]


CAREER: Professor and author. Florida International University, Miami, FL, lecturer, 1982-83, assistant professor, 1983-84; University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, assistant professor, 1985-86; Tufts University Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford, MA, assistant professor, 1986-90, associate professor of international politics, 1990-2000; Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China, professor of social science, 2000—. Nanjing University, visiting research scholar, 1986 and 1991-92; Harvard University Fairbank Center for East Asian Research, associate in research, 1986, member of executive committee, 1989-91; University of International Business, visiting research scholar, 1992. Conference coordinator and conductor of seminars; commentator for radio and television.


MEMBER: Canadian Institute for International Affairs, American Political Science Association, Association for Asian Studies.


AWARDS, HONORS: Sino-Canadian student exchange fellow, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada and Department of External Affairs, 1974-76; doctoral fellow, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 1981-82; postdoctoral fellow, Harvard University Fairbank Center for East Asian Research, 1984-85; research grants from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 1985-86 and 1992-95; Henry Luce Foundation, 1989-91; and Ford Foundation, 1992-93; Advanced Scholars Program for Study in the People's Republic of China fellow, Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China, 1991-92. Also received a research grant from the United States Institute for Peace.


WRITINGS:

Agrarian Radicalism in China, 1968-1981, Harvard University Press (Cambridge, MA), 1989.

(Editor, with William A. Joseph and Christine Wong) New Perspectives on China's Cultural Revolution, Harvard University Press (Cambridge, MA), 1991.

(Editor, with Suzanne Ogden, Kathleen Hartford, and Lawrence Sullivan) China's Search for Democracy: The Student and Mass Movement of 1989, M. E. Sharpe (Armonk, NY), 1992.

(With Chen Changgui) China's Brain Drain to theUnited States: View of Overseas Chinese Students and Scholars in the 1990s, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California (Berkeley, CA), 1995.

Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in theReform Era, M. E. Sharpe (Armonk, NY), 1997.

Internationalizing China: Domestic Interests andGlobal Linkages, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 2002.

Democratic Values, Political Structures, and Alternative Politics in Greater China, United States Institute of Peace (Washington, DC), 2002.


Contributor to books, including Chinese Rural Development: The Great Transformation, edited by William L. Parish, M. E. Sharpe (Armonk, NY), 1985; Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance, edited by Forrest Colburn, M. E. Sharpe (Armonk, NY), 1990; Building Sino-American Relations: An Agenda for the 1990s, edited by William Tow, Paragon Press (New York, NY), 1991; China Briefing, 1991, edited by William A. Joseph, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 1992; and China Briefing, 1992, edited by William A. Joseph, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 1993. Contributor of articles and essays to periodicals, including China Quarterly, Peasant Studies, Journal of Northeast Asian Studies, China Business Review, Harvard International Review, Boston Globe, New York Times, Asian Wall Street Journal, and American Political Science Review.


SIDELIGHTS: David Zweig, a renowned professor of political and social science with a special interest in Chinese politics and political economy, teamed up with scholar Chen Changgui in 1995 to conduct a large-scale social research project involving Chinese students living in the United States and the resultant effect on China. Compiling their research, the two scholars published China's Brain Drain to the United States: Views of Overseas Chinese Students and Scholars in the 1990s. Writing in the International Migration Review, Qirong Li deemed the book "one of the best scholarly accounts of 'China's Brain Drain,'" stating that it "deserves a wide readership."


As part of their research for China's Brain Drain to the United States, Zweig and Changgui interviewed 277 Chinese students and scholars using a representative questionnaire, which primarily asked the subjects to divulge their intentions to return to China or remain in the United States. The results were unlike those of any previously conducted study. Eighteen percent of those surveyed said they would rather stay in the United States than return to China. These subjects cited reasons such as greater political freedom and availability of jobs. About fifty-eight percent of the subjects surveyed said they planned to return to China. These subjects mentioned motivations such as the desire for strong cultural and family connections, as well as elevated social status. Zweig and Changgui discovered that certain factors affected both groups, such as original intention of returning or not upon arrival to the United States, gender (far more men than women intended to return to China), or academic concentration (those in the humanities and arts were more likely to remain in the United States than those in the social sciences). The study was well received by its subject-educated critics. In Pacific Affairs, Ruth Hayhoe deemed the study "well-documented and thoughtfully researched," pointing out that China's Brain Drain to the United States "goes beyond numbers, trends, emphases that can be identified from consular files, the press, and the research literature, to an understanding of the subjective experience of the major actors in this drama—the Chinese students and scholars themselves." Reviewer Lawrence K. Hong, in the Journal of Asian and African Studies, suggested that "in spite of the fact that the book uses advanced statistical analyses, it is very readable even for the average reader not so familiar with logistic regression models."


Zweig's next publication was a sole venture titled Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era. This work focuses on economic reform in China and how different sectors have handled it, profited from it, and lost as a result of it. The book discusses the responsibility system, privatization and changing property rights, and industrialization among other topics. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between state enterprises and township and village enterprises (TVEs), with the former at a disadvantage because of enforced limitations. In Pacific Affairs, contributor Keith Griffin called the book a "splendid volume" that "should be warmly welcomed."


In his next work, Internationalizing China: Domestic Interests and Global Linkages, Zweig defines internationalization as "the expanded flow of goods, services, and people across state boundaries, thereby increasing the share of transactional exchanges relative to domestic ones, along with a decline in regulating those flows." In this book, Zweig focuses on four components of Chinese economy: urban zones, rural areas, education and career, and foreign assistance organizations contributing to the country. Zweig provides an analysis of each sector and how each developed its own market. "This book provides excellent documentation and analysis of how China developed markets for several types of products within four main sectors. . . . This thorough analysis is especially useful for scholars in comparative politics and international relations," stated Library Journal reviewer Peggy Spitzer Christoff. In Foreign Affairs, Lucian W. Pye observed that the book is "rich both in ideas and as a statistical resource." Writing in Business Week, Mark Clifford reported, "This book is not for everyone: Zweig's writing is often dense and academic. But it contains much valuable information and analysis."


David Zweig told CA: "When I was twenty-one I had two choices in front of me: become a lawyer or go to graduate school and study China. In envisioning the first, I saw myself ten years later, married, with two kids, and living in the suburbs of Toronto. The second option seemed much more exciting. I have never regretted the choice."


BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Political Science Review, March, 2000, David Zweig, review of The Entrepreneurial State in China: Real Estate and Commerce Departments Reform in Era Tiankin.

Business Week, November 11, 2002, Mark L. Clifford, "Winds of Change," review of Internationalizing China: Domestic Interests and Global Linkages, p. 24.

China Review International, spring, 1997, review of China's Brain Drain to the United States: Views of Overseas Chinese Students and Scholars in the 1990s, p. 298; spring, 1999, review of Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era, p. 300.

Choice, January, 1998, review of Freeing China'sFarmers, p. 900.

International Migration Review, winter, 1997, Qirong Li, review of China's Brain Drain to the United States, pp. 1128-1129.

Journal of Asian and African Studies, June, 1997, Lawrence K. Hong, review of China's Brain Drain to the United States, pp. 153-154.

Library Journal, August, 2002, Peggy Spitzer Christoff, review of Internationalizing China, p. 121.

National Interest, fall, 1999, Henry Rowen, response to "Undemocratic Capitalism: China and the Limits of Economism," p. 129.

Pacific Affairs, spring, 1998, Keith Griffin, review of Freeing China's Farmers, pp. 91-92; summer, 1998, Ruth Hayhoe, review of China's Brain Drain to the United States, pp. 240-241.

Reference and Research Book News, November, 1997, review of Freeing China's Farmers, p. 90.


ONLINE

Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada Web site,http://www.asiapacificresearch.ca/ (November 25, 2002), "Canada-Asia Pacific Research Network (CAPRN) Specialist Listing: Dr. David Zweig."

Foreign Affairs Web site,http://www.foreignaffairs.com/ (November 25, 2002), Lucian W. Pye, review of Internationalizing China.

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Web site,http://www.ust.hk/ (November 25, 2002), "David Zweig."

M. E. Sharpe Web site,http://www.mesharpe.com/ (February 18, 2004), description of Freeing China's Farmers.

United States Institute of Peace,http://www.usip.org/ (February 18, 2004), online text of Democratic Values, Political Structures, and Alternative Politics in Greater China.*