Skip to main content

Vance, Joel M. 1934–

Vance, Joel M. 1934–

PERSONAL: Born 1934; married; wife's name, Marty. Hobbies and other interests: Fishing, canoeing, playing guitar.

ADDRESSES: Home—5213 Route D, Russellville, MO 65074-2218.

CAREER: Writer for twenty years with Missouri Department of Conservation; Sterling College, Sterling, KS, faculty member.

WRITINGS:

Grandma and the Buck Deer, and Other Tales of Youthful Disaster, Winchester Press (Tulsa, OK), 1980.

Upland Bird Hunting, illustrations by Tom Beecham, Outdoor Life Books (New York, NY), 1981.

Confessions of an Outdoor Maladroit, illustrations by Anthony Hillman, foreword by Michael McIntosh, Amwell Press (Clinton, NJ), 1983.

Bobs, Brush, and Brittanies: A Long Love Affair with Quail Hunting, Lyons & Burford Publishers (New York, NY), 1997.

Down Home Missouri: When Girls Were Scary and Basketball Was King, University of Missouri Press (Columbia, MO), 2000.

Tails I Lose: Coping with Bird Dogs, Derrydale Press (Lanham, MD), 2000.

Autumn Shadows: Outdoor Tales of the Supernatural … Including "The Invincible Grouse Hunter," illustrated by Cole Johnson, Bonasa Press (Columbia, PA), 2002.

Also author of Billy Barnstorm the Birch Lake Bomber, and Other Tales of Youthful Disaster. Humor editor for FineTravel.com; columnist for Gun Dog and Wing and Shot. Contributor to periodicals of articles on outdoor life.

SIDELIGHTS: Joel M. Vance, an outdoor columnist and humor editor of FineTravel.com, spent twenty years as a conservation writer but is better known for his humorous books, such as Bobs, Brush, and Brittanies: A Long Love Affair with Quail Hunting. His amusing accounts of life in rural Missouri that have delighted many readers, even those who are not enamored by outdoor life. According to a Publishers Weekly reviewer, Bobs, Brush, and Brittanies is a folksy but informative guide to quail hunting, narrated as if its author is "imparting wisdom to family members … or to good friends."

Vance has also published books on bird dogs, supernatural tales from the outdoors, and memories of his youth. Among those in the last category is Down Home Missouri: When Girls Were Scary and Basketball Was King. In this work, wrote Nancy P. Shires in Library Journal, Vance sounds "a little like comedian Jeff Foxworthy" as he writes of moving from Chicago to Missouri, where he grew up on a farm in the 1950s. He discusses serious subjects such as the loss of wildlife habitats, but he reserves his best writing for personal experiences like his first kiss, his embarrassing forays onto the basketball court, and his memories of listening to Walter Winchell and Amos 'n' Andy on the radio. Booklist contributor George Cohen called Down Home Missouri a "humorous and poignant recollection."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, December 15, 2000, George Cohen, review of Down Home Missouri: When Girls Were Scary and Basketball Was King, p. 784.

Library Journal, January 1, 2001, Nancy P. Shires, review of Down Home Missouri, p. 137.

Publishers Weekly, June 2, 1997, review of Bobs, Brush, and Brittanies: A Long Love Affair with Quail Hunting, p. 61.

ONLINE

Fine Travel.com, http://www.finetravel.com/ (July 26, 2004).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Vance, Joel M. 1934–." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Vance, Joel M. 1934–." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/vance-joel-m-1934

"Vance, Joel M. 1934–." Contemporary Authors. . Retrieved September 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/vance-joel-m-1934

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.