Strum, Philippa 1938-

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STRUM, Philippa 1938-

PERSONAL: Born December 14, 1938, in New York, NY; daughter of Joseph B. and Ida P. Strum; children: David Strum Weiss. Education: Brandeis University, B.A., 1959; Harvard University, Ed.M., 1960; New School for Social Research, Ph.D., 1964.

ADDRESSES: Home—124 W. 79th St., New York, NY 10024-6446. Office—Department of Political Science, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER: Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY, lecturer in political science, 1962-64; Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, instructor, 1964-65, assistant professor, 1965-72, associate professor of political science, 1972-73; Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, associate professor of political science, 1972-75; City University of New York, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, professor, 1976-99; Dubach Visiting Distinguished Professor, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, April, 1988; Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Lyons Distinguished Visiting Professor, April, 1997; Wayne State University Law School, Detroit, MI, Walter Gibbs Visiting Professor of Constitutional Law, winter, 2000, winter, 2001; Brooklyn College, New York, NY, Broeklundian Professor of Political Science, 1998-99, Broeklundian Professor of Political Science Emerita, 1999—. Instructor at New School for Social Research, summers, 1962-64; visiting professor, Barnard College, 1978-79; visiting associate professor at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, 1972-73; member, CUNY Graduate Center Faculty, 1963-99.

MEMBER: American Political Science Association, American Association of University Professors, Caucus for a New Political Science, American Civil Liberties Union, New York Civil Liberties Union.

AWARDS, HONORS: Research fellow, Harvard University, summer, 1960; Fulbright Senior Lecturer, fellow, Truman Institute of Hebrew University, 1985-86; City University of New York Faculty Resident Award Program, 1994-95, 1999-2000; Fulbright senior lecturer, Bogazici Universitesi, Istanbul, spring, 1995; fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1997-98; Honorable mention, American Bar Association Silver Gavel Award, 2000, for When the Nazis Came to Skokie: Freedom for Speech We Hate.

WRITINGS:

(With Michael Shmidman) On Studying Political Science, Goodyear Publishing (Santa Monica, CA), 1969.

Presidential Power and American Democracy, Goodyear Publishing (Santa Monica, CA), 1972, 2nd edition, 1979.

The Supreme Court and "Political Questions," University of Alabama Press (University, AL), 1974.

Louis D. Brandeis: Justice for the People, Harvard University Press, (Cambridge, MA), 1984.

The Women Are Marching: The Second Sex and the Palestinian Revolution, Lawrence Hill Books, (Chicago, IL), 1992.

Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, University Press of Kansas, (Lawrence, KS), 1993.

(Editor) Brandeis on Democracy, University Press of Kansas, (Lawrence, KS), 1995.

Privacy, the Debate in the United States since 1945, under the general editorship of Gerald W. Nash and Richard W. Etulain, Harcourt Brace College Publishers, (Fort Worth, TX), 1998.

When the Nazis Came to Skokie: Freedom for Speech We Hate, University Press of Kansas, (Lawrence, KS), 1999.

Women in the Barracks: The VMI Case and Equal Rights, University Press of Kansas, (Lawrence, KS), 2002.

(Editor, with Danielle Tarantolo) Women Immigrants in the United States: Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Migration Policy Institute, September 9, 2002, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (Washington, DC), 2003.

Contributor to many professional journals and to New Republic.

SIDELIGHTS: Philippa Strum is a political scientist, human rights activist, and a foremost authority on former Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis. Brandeis was known as the "People's Attorney" for his work on behalf of the public and for his tenure as Supreme Court Justice (1916-1938). After publishing her critically acclaimed biography Louis P. Brandeis: Justice for the People, Strum penned Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, in which she uncovers Brandeis's political values. "This latest work is particularly significant, since Brandeis was not a systematic thinker who derived ideas from books," noted Kermit L. Hall in The Historian. Hall went on to say, "Perhaps only a biographer of Strum's insight could tease from Brandeis's life anything like a complete understanding of his ideas. Nevertheless, she does exactly that."

Hall explains that Brandeis believed political and economic liberty complemented and reinforced each other. In Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, Strum reveals Brandeis's aversions to big government and big business because they threaten individual liberty. "In defining the basic elements of Brandeis's political views, Strum offers interesting contrasts between Brandeis and Dewey, and Brandeis and the Progressive tradition, in order to demonstrate the uniqueness of his thought," observed David Schultz in the Law and Politics Book Review. In Brandeis on Democracy, Strum's third book about Brandeis, Strum presents selections from Brandeis's speeches and letters to family and colleagues as well as newspaper interviews and judicial opinions.

The Women Are Marching: The Second Sex and the Palestinian Revolution recounts the Palestinian uprising known as the intifada, which erupted in the Gaza Strip and spread to the West Bank. Intifada's commercial strikes and mass demonstrations resulted in political and economic change and also stimulated reform in the lives of Palestinian women, who had been largely confined to the home. Intifada prompted Palestinian women to take to the streets to challenge religion and social traditions, particularly those related to women's rights. Strum traveled to the West Bank in July, 1989, to observe the Palestinian women's movement and interview women involved. A Publisher's Weekly reviewer maintained that in The Women Are Marching Strum presents a "fresh, in-depth perspective on the changing sexual and social roles of Palestinian women" and "raises disturbing questions about the growing influence of Islamic fundamentalism on West Bank women's lives and about whether women's advances will outlive the occupation."

Strum argues the need for personal space in Privacy: The Debate in the United States since 1945. She concludes privacy is essential for the psychological well-being of individuals and the proper function of democracy. Strum expresses her concern that technological advances may lead to an infringement on the right to privacy. "Strum's new book on privacy is an absolute delight," remarked Bill Weaver in the Law and Politics Book Review. Weaver observed that Strum "uses examples not merely meant to shock or dismay but also to make clear the underlying policy considerations and estimations of convenience that lead to incursions on privacy."

In a review of When the Nazis Came to Skokie: Freedom for Speech We Hate, Jerold S. Auerbach noted, "Strum is alert to the paradox of extending free speech to those who would then destroy it for others." Strum contemplates whether racists and anti-Semites should be afforded free speech under the protection of the First Amendment in her analysis of Skokie v. Collin, in which the National Socialist Party of America, a neo-Nazi group, sued for the right to hold an anti-Jewish demonstration in Skokie, a Chicago suburb heavily populated with Holocaust survivors. The Nazis eventually won the case, but ironically never held the demonstration. Wrote Temple Lentz in a review published on the Centerstage Chicago Web site, "Strum's book is as much social history as legal, as much political science as critical theory, and all of it is written gracefully, intelligently, and simply." Lentz went on to say, "The lives and voices of the people involved leap from the page as if to tell their own stories aloud, and let readers make the final decision." Library Journal's Philip Young noted that Strum "carefully and methodically traces the history and issues of the case all the way to the United States Supreme Court."

In Women in the Barracks: The VMI Case and Equal Rights, Strum examines the integration of women into military institutions. The book discusses the landmark case of United States v. Virginia, the 1996 U.S. Supreme Court Case that forced Virginia Military Institute (VMI) to end its 157-year tradition as an all-male institution and admit women. Strum explores the impact of the case on the men and women at VMI, dubbed the "West Point of the South." Writing in History: Review of New Books, Lance Janda considered the book "a rare gem" that combines "rigorous primary and secondary research with graceful prose." Strum analyzes both viewpoints in the book and includes interviews with opposing lawyers as well as VMI administrators and faculty. She discusses what led Justice Ginsburg to conclude that while VMI's rigorous and harsh training methods deter some women from applying, they also deter some men, and that women should have the right to attend the school if they are qualified to do so. Janda observed that "Strum does overreach a bit when assessing the importance of the VMI case," noting that America's federal service academies admitted women in 1976, two decades before VMI. However, Janda maintained that his criticism is "entirely minor" and described the book as "a balanced and very satisfying work overall" that appeals to a wide audience including scholars and anyone interested in the history of VMI.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Directory of American Scholars, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 2001.

PERIODICALS

American Academy of Political and Social Science, March, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis: Justice for the People, p. 203; July, 1995, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 177.

American Historical Review, April, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 510; December, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 1766.

American Jewish History, March, 2000, Jerold S. Auerbach, review of When the Nazis Came to Skokie: Freedom for Speech We Hate, p. 147.

American Political Science Review, June, 1977, review of The Supreme Court and "Political Questions," p. 744; March, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 228.

American Spectator, April, 1995, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 685.

Bookwatch, October, 1992, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 5.

Book World, January 2, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 4.

Choice, September, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 193; January, 1993, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 865; January, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 870; June, 1995, review of Brandeis on Democracy, p. 1672.

Harvard Law Review, December, 1996, review of Brandeis on Democracy, p. 561.

Historian, summer, 1994, Kermit L. Hall, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, pp. 761-762.

History: Reviews of New Books, winter, 1995, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 57; summer, 2002, Lance Janda, review of Women in the Barracks: The VMI Case and Equal Rights, pp. 140-142.

Journal of American History, September, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 438; December, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 1350.

Journal of American Studies, December, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 464.

Journal of Politics, May, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 754.

Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 302.

Law and Politics Book Review, October, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, pp. 136-139; July, 1998, review of Privacy: The Debate in the United States since 1945, pp. 289-291.

Library Journal, May 1, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 894; June 15, 1992, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 91; March 1, 1999, Philip Young, review of When the Nazis Came to Skokie, p. 98.

Middle East, December, 1992, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 42.

Ms., July, 1992, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 66.

Multicultural Review, December, 1993, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 17.

National Civic Review, November, 1980, review of Presidential Power and American Democracy, p. 592; December, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 590.

Perspectives on Political Science, summer, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 144.

Political Science Quarterly, spring, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 155.

Presidential Studies Quarterly, summer, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 655.

Publishers Weekly, April 6, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 64; June 8, 1992, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 59; July 26, 1993, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, pp. 50-52.

Religious Studies Review, April, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 203.

Review of Politics, summer, 1994, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism, p. 602.

Reviews in American History, March, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 94.

San Francisco Review of Books, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 26.

Small Press, review of The Women Are Marching, p. 59.

Times Literary Supplement, April 5, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 373.

Virginia Quarterly Review, autumn, 1984, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 734.

Yale Law Journal, November, 1985, review of Louis D. Brandeis, p. 195.

ONLINE

American Jewish Archives Journal Web site, http://www.huc.edu/aja/97-r4.htm/ (November 25, 2002), Arthur Gross-Schaefer, review of Brandeis: Beyond Progressivism.

Centerstage Online,http://search.centerstage.net/literature/articles/strum.html/ (November 25, 2002), Temple Lentz, review of When the Nazis Came to Skokie.

New York Times Online,http://www.nytimes.com/ (July 7, 2002), Paula Friedman review of Women in the Barracks.*

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