Scheil, Andrew P. 1968–

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Scheil, Andrew P. 1968–

PERSONAL:

Born September 9, 1968. Education: Rutgers University, B.A., 1990; University of Toronto, M.A., 1991, Ph.D., 1996.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Roseville, MN. Office—University of Minnesota, Department of English, 207 Lind Hall, 207 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Academic. Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, CT, adjunct professor, 1996-99; University of Hartford, Hartford, CT, adjunct professor, 1997-98; Ohio State University, Columbus, visiting assistant professor, 1999-2000; University of Connecticut, Hartford, visiting assistant professor, 2000-01; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, lecturer and tutor in history and literature, 2001-04, extension school lecturer, 2001-05, Freshman Seminar Program lecturer, 2003-04, department of English and American literature research associate, 2004-05; Boston University, Boston, MA, College of Arts and Sciences Writing Program lecturer, 2004-05; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, assistant professor, 2005-07, associate professor, 2007—. Henry Rutgers Scholar, Rutgers University, 1989-90; Open fellow, University of Toronto, 1990-95; National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for College Teachers fellow, 1996, 1999; faculty summer research fellow, University of Minnesota, 2006; McKnight summer research fellow, University of Minnesota, 2006; McKnight Presidential fellow, University of Minnesota, 2007-10; National Endowment for the Humanities fellow, 2007-08; Solmsen fellow, Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2008-09.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Best first book award, International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, 2005, for the best first monograph published from 2003 to 2004 in all the fields of Anglo-Saxon studies, for The Footsteps of Israel; John Nicholas Brown Prize, Medieval Academy of America, 2008, for the best first monograph published in 2004 by a member of the association, for The Footsteps of Israel.

WRITINGS:

The Footsteps of Israel: Understanding Jews in Anglo-Saxon England, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 2004.

Contributor to periodicals, including Neophilologus, Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory and Medieval Studies, Explicator, Modern Language Review, Medieval Review, Bulletin of the Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies, Journal of Medieval Latin, Studies in the Literary Imagination, and Anglo-Saxon England.

SIDELIGHTS:

Andrew P. Scheil is an academic whose research interests include Old English language and literature, medieval Latin literature, Middle English literature, literary theory, the cultures and literatures of late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, and the traditions of exegesis, historiography, and geography in the Middle Ages.

Scheil published his first book, The Footsteps of Israel: Understanding Jews in Anglo-Saxon England, in 2004. The book won an award from the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists for the best first monograph published from 2003 to 2004 in all the fields of Anglo-Saxon studies. It also won the 2008 John Nicholas Brown Prize from the Medieval Academy of America for the best first monograph published in 2004 by a member of the association, which represents all the disciplines of medieval studies. The Footsteps of Israel looks at the period before 1290 where a Jewish population lived in England and attempts to examine the perspectives of the Anglo-Saxon Christian population toward the Jewish sojourners.

Anthony Bale, reviewing the book in Medium Aevum, described the "beautifully presented" book as "a timely and useful intervention in this fascinating area." Bale concluded that "The Footsteps of Israel is a significant, timely, and powerful study, even as it seems more attuned to European and Christian discussions of time, divinity, and good than to its specifically Anglo-Saxon context." Paul E. Szarmach, writing in the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, noted that the author "brings into focus some twelve texts and authors, Bede to Beowulf," but pointed out that the author "is aware that his provocative inclusion of Beowulf is, unlike his other hard evidence for the mythos, an attempt to identify the informing intention behind the poem's design." Szarmach summarized that The Footsteps of Israel provides "early medieval studies an overview that will become the point of departure for future work."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Journal of Ecclesiastical History, January 1, 2006, Paul E. Szarmach, review of The Footsteps of Israel: Understanding Jews in Anglo-Saxon England, p. 115.

Journal of English and Germanic Philology, October 1, 2005, Scott DeGregorio, review of The Footsteps of Israel, p. 551.

Journal of Theological Studies, April 1, 2006, Jane Roberts, review of The Footsteps of Israel, p. 344.

Medieval Review, January 1, 2006, Mary Clayton, review of The Footsteps of Israel.

Medium Aevum, March 22, 2006, Anthony Bale, review of The Footsteps of Israel, p. 145.

Modern Philology, November 1, 2005, Andrew S. Rabin, review of The Footsteps of Israel, p. 227.

Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies, April 1, 2006, Eugene Green, review of The Footsteps of Israel, p. 594.

ONLINE

University of Minnesota, English Department Web site,http://english.cla.umn.edu/ (June 17, 2008), author profile.