McMullan, Kate (Hall) 1947-

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McMULLAN, Kate (Hall) 1947-

(Katy Hall, K. H. McMullan)

PERSONAL: Born January 16, 1947, in St. Louis, MO; daughter of Lee Aker (a physician) and Kathryn (a teacher and flight attendant; maiden name, Huey) Hall; married James Burroughs McMullan (an illustrator), June 9, 1979; children: Leigh Fenwick. Education: University of Tulsa, B.S., 1969; Ohio State University, M.A., 1972. Hobbies and other interests: Gardening, birding, reading.

ADDRESSES: Home and office—18 Bluff Point Rd., Sag Harbor, NY 11963. Agent—Holly McGhee, Pippin Properties, 155 East 38th St., Ste. 2H, New York, NY 10016. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: Writer, novelist, and educator. Teacher at public schools in Los Angeles, CA, 1969–71; U.S. Department of Defense, Washington, DC, schoolteacher in Hahn, West Germany, 1972–75; Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, Inc., New York, NY, editor, 1976–78; writer, 1978–; New York University School of Continuing Education, New York, NY, lecturer in "Writing for Children," 1989–; faculty member, New School's MFA Writing Program.

MEMBER: Authors Guild, PEN, Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.

AWARDS, HONORS: Honor Award from New York Academy of Sciences, 1980, for Magic in the Movies; Mark Twain List of Excellent Books (Missouri), and Bluebonnet List of Excellent Books (Texas), both 1989, both for The Great Ideas of Lila Fenwick; Children's Book Award List (West Virginia), 1989–90, for Great Advice from Lila Fenwick; Intellectual Freedom Award honorable mention, New York Library Association, 1993; Pick of the List, American Bookseller, and one of the Ten Best Picture Books of 1993, New York Times, both for Nutcracker Noel; CRABbery honor, 1993, for The Great Eggspectations of Lila Fenwick; Ten Best Picture Books of 1995 selection, New York Times, 1995 Picture Book Award, Parents' Choice, Reading Magic Award, Parenting, 1995, all for Hey, Pipsqueak!; Boston Globe-Horn Book honor book, 2002, for I Stink!

WRITINGS:

The Mystery of the Missing Mummy, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1984.

(Adaptor) Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Random House (New York, NY), 1984.

The Great Ideas of Lila Fenwick, Dial (New York, NY), 1986.

(Adaptor) Gaston Leroux, Phantom of the Opera, Random House (New York, NY), 1989.

Dinosaur Hunters, Random House (New York, NY), 1989.

Great Advice from Lila Fenwick, Dial (New York, NY), 1989.

Good Night, Stella, Penguin/Putnam Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 1990.

The Story of Harriet Tubman, Penguin/Putnam Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 1990.

The Great Eggspectations of Lila Fenwick, Farrar, Straus, (New York, NY), 1991.

Under the Mummy's Spell, Farrar, Straus, (New York, NY), 1991.

(With Jim McMullan) The Noisy Giants' Tea Party, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

The Biggest Mouth in Baseball, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1993.

Nutcracker Noel, Demco (Madison, WI), 1993.

Hey, Pipsqueak!, illustrated by Jim McMullan, Harper-Collins (New York, NY), 1995.

The Story of Bill Clinton and Al Gore, Gareth Stevens (Milwaukee, WI), 1996.

Muppet Treasure Island, Penguin/Putnam Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 1996.

Noel the First, illustrated by Jim McMullan, HarperCollins/Michael di Capua (New York, NY), 1996.

The Mummy's Gold, Penguin/Putnam Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 1996.

If You Were My Bunny, illustrated by David McPhail, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1996.

Dragon Slayer's Academy: The New Kid at School, Putnam/Grosset (New York, NY), 1997.

Harriet Tubman, Gareth Stevens (Milwaukee, WI), 1997.

No No, Jo!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

Class Trip to the Cave of Doom, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1998.

Countdown to the Year 1000, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1999.

Papa's Song, illustrated by Jim McMullan, Farrar (New York, NY), 2000.

As Far as I Can SEE: Meg's Diary, St. Louis to the Kansas Territory, 1856, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Supercat, illustrated by Pascal Lemaitre, Workman (New York, NY), 2002.

I Stink!, illustrated by Jim McMullan, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 2002.

I'm Mighty!, illustrated by Jim McMullan, Joanna Cotler Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Nubby Bear, illustrated by Stan Herman, Random House (New York, NY), 2003.

Nubby Bunny, illustrated by Stan Herman, Random House (New York, NY), 2003.

Nubby Cat, illustrated by Stan Herman, Random House (New York, NY), 2003.

Nubby Puppy, illustrated by Stan Herman, Random House (New York, NY), 2003.

Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, illustrated by R. W. Alley, Dial Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 2003.

Rock-a-Baby Band, illustrated by Janie Bynum, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 2003.

A Fine Start, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2003.

Ninety-Seven Ways to Train a Dragon, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2003.

(With Pascal Lemaitre) Supercat to the Rescue, Workman Publishing (New York, NY), 2003.

Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, illustrated by R. W. Alley, Dial Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 2004.

My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon (novel), art by Adrienne Yorinks, Joanna Cotler Books (New York, NY) 2004.

Help! It's Parents Day at DSA, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2004.

The Ghost of Sir Herbert Dungeonstone, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2004.

Danger! Wizard at Work, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2004.

Baby Goose, illustrated by Pascal Lemaitre, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2004.

Pig Latin: Not Just for Pigs!, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2005.

(Adaptor) Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, text illustrations by Paul Van Munching, Random House (New York, NY), 2005.

Double Dragon Trouble, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2005.

Beware! It's Friday the Thirteenth, illustrated by Bill Basso, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 2005.

Bathtub Blues, illustrated by Janie Bynum, Little, Brown (New York, NY), 2005.

(With husband, Jim McMullan) I'm Dirty!, Joanna Cotler Books (New York, NY), 2006.

Editor of Early Bird, 1982.

"MYTH O' MANIA" SERIES

Phone Home, Persephone!, illustrated by David LaFleur, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2002.

Have a Hot Time, Hades!, illustrated by David LaFleur, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2002.

Say Cheese, Medusa!, illustrated by David LaFleur, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2002.

Nice Shot, Cupid!, illustrated by David LaFleur, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2002.

Stop That Bull, Theseus!, illustrated by David LaFleur, Hyperion Books for Children (New York, NY), 2003.

"FLUFFY" SERIES

Fluffy Goes to School, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Turtleback Books (Madison, WI), 1997.

Fluffy's Happy Halloween, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1998.

Fluffy Saves Christmas, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Turtleback Books (Madison, WI), 1998.

Fluffy and the Fire Fighters, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1999.

Fluffy Meets the Dinosaurs, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2000.

Fluffy's 100th Day of School, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Turtleback Books (Madison, WI), 2000.

Fluffy Meets the Tooth Fairy, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2000.

Fluffy's Valentine's Day, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2000.

Fluffy's School Bus Adventure, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2000.

Fluffy's Thanksgiving, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2000.

Fluffy's Funny Field Trip, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy's New Garden, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy, the Secret Santa, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy Goes Apple Picking, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy's Trick-or-Treat, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy's Spring Vacation, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy Meets the Groundhog, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2001.

Fluffy Learns to Swim, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2002.

Fluffy Goes to Washington, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2002.

Fluffy's Lucky Day, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2002.

Fluffy and the Snow Pig, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2003.

Fluffy Plants a Jelly Bean, illustrated by Mavis Smith, Scholastic (New York, NY), 2003.

UNDER NAME KATY HALL

Nothing but Soup, Follett (Chicago, IL), 1976.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Chicken Jokes and Puzzles, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1977.

(With Jane O'Connor) Magic in the Movies: The Story of Special Effects, Doubleday (New York, NY), 1980.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) A Gallery of Monsters, Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Pig Jokes and Puzzles, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1983.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Fishy Riddles, Dial (New York, NY), 1983.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) 101 Bug Jokes, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1984.

Garfield: Jokes, Riddles, and Other Silly Stuff, Random House (New York, NY), 1984.

Garfield: The Big Fat Book of Jokes and Riddles, Random House (New York, NY), 1984.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Buggy Riddles, Dial (New York, NY), 1986.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Grizzly Riddles, Dial (New York, NY), 1987.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) 101 Back-to-School Jokes, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1987.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Mummy Riddles, illustrated by Nicole Rubel, Dial (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Olive You! And Other Valentine Knock-Knock Jokes You'll A-Door, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Bunny Riddles, illustrated by Nicole Rubel, Dial (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Chicky Riddles, illustrated by Thor Wickstrom, Dial (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Easter Yolks: Eggs-Cellent Riddles to Crack You Up, illustrated by R. W. Alley, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Hearty Har Har: Valentine Riddles You'll Love, illustrated by R. W. Alley, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Puppy Riddles, illustrated by Thor Wickstrom, Dial (New York, NY), 1998.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Creepy Riddles, illustrated by S. D. Schindler, Dial (New York, NY), 1998.

Really, Really Bad Sports Jokes, illustrated by Rick Stromoski, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1998.

Really, Really, Really Bad Jokes, illustrated by Mike Lester, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 1999.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Kitty Riddles, illustrated by R. W. Alley, Dial (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Jingle Jokes: Christmas Riddles to Deck the Ha Ha Halls, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Turkey Ticklers: And Other A-Maize-ingly Corny Thanksgiving Knock-Knock Jokes, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, Harper-Festival (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Boo Who? And Other Wicked Halloween Knock-Knock Jokes, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Easter Crack-Ups: Knock-Knock Jokes Funny-Side Up, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Ribbit Riddles, illustrated by Robert Bender, Dial (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Hanukkah Ha-Has: Knock-Knock Jokes That Are a Latke Fun, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Summer Camp Crack-Ups: And Lot S'More Knock-Knock Jokes to Write Home About, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, Harper-Collins (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Turkey Riddles, illustrated by Kristin Bora, Dial (New York, NY), 2002.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Dino Riddles, illustrated by Nicole Rubel, Dial (New York, NY), 2002.

Back-to-School Belly Busters, illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 2002.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Piggy Riddles, pictures by Renee Adriana, Dial Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 2004.

(With Lisa Eisenberg) Stinky Riddles, pictures by Renee Adriani, Dial Books for Young Readers (New York, NY), 2005.

ADAPTATIONS: I Stink! was adapted into an animated feature.

SIDELIGHTS: During the late 1990s, Kate McMullan authored dozens of titles for young readers, including numerous joke books with Lisa Eisenberg under the name Katy Hall. She has also written a lullaby collection, If You Were My Bunny, with illustrations by David McPhail. Here, several different little animals are depicted with their mothers. The mother bear, cat, rabbit, duck, and dog each coo a good-night song to their charges, with the lyrics changed to befit each species. Amy E. Brandt in Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books noted that its "coziness will appeal to those not-quite-drowsy youngsters who plead for one more song." A critic for Kirkus Reviews noted that If You Were My Bunny "serves as a missing link between board books and … picture books."

Piggy Riddles offers a book full of word play and riddles based on pigs and all things pig-like—ham, snout, pork, and bacon, with some farm references thrown in. What position does a pig play on the baseball team? Snout stop. What was the hog doing in the kitchen? He was bacon. Some of the riddles might require some explanation by adults, but the book nonetheless "will put many kids in hog heaven," stated Booklist reviewer Ilene Cooper.

McMullan has worked with her illustrator husband, Jim, on several titles. These include The Noisy Giants' Tea Party and Nutcracker Noel, the latter title center-ing upon a little girl and her dedication to ballet. Both books grew out of experiences with their own daughter—The Noisy Giants' Tea Party was a tale they invented to explain the loud noises emanating from the garbage trucks in the street below their New York City apartment. Their daughter also loved ballet, and in Nutcracker Noel the little girl is initially dejected about being chosen to play a tree in an annual holiday production of the classic children's ballet. Noel's ballet saga continues in Noel the First, and in this story she is thrilled when Madame orders her to move to first place, an honored position, at the barre. But a new dancer joins the class, and usurps Noel's spot; another, even better new student arrives, and the other two dancers battle it out, with Noel observing the conflict. In the end, Noel dances with her heart, which pleases Madame. "For all the exaggeration, there is plenty of truth to this tale—not just for prima ballerinas," noted a Publishers Weekly reviewer. Carol Schene, writing for School Library Journal, forecasted that "young readers will identify with Noel and the dilemma of wanting to be first."

McMullan has also penned a comic fantasy tale, Dragon Slayer: The New Kid at School. The story centers on humble Wiglaf of Pinwick, ill-treated by his boorish family. A traveling minstrel tells his fortune, which leads Wiglaf to the Dragon Academy. He brings his pet pig, Daisy, along. At the school, Wiglaf realizes that his aversion to gore makes him a poor candidate for a Dragon Slayer degree, unlike his zealous new friend, Eric. The pair are sent off on their first mission to slay the dragon Gorzil, and the situation seems dire until Wiglaf finds that the dragon's secret weakness is for knock-knock jokes—for Wiglaf has a long list of them in his memory. "Wiglaf is a hero without spilling a single drop of blood," wrote School Library Journal critic Virginia Golodetz, while Booklist's John Peters remarked that "McMullan creates an appealing, unwarlike protagonist, with the inner stuff to cope with situations both daffy and dangerous."

In Baby Goose, McMullan recasts more than two dozen familiar Mother Goose nursery rhymes with babies occupying the central roles. The poems are altered a bit to accommodate the babies—the Grand Old Duke of York becomes the Baby Duke of York, for example. The rearranged rhymes give the youngest readers much exposure to the world of babies, satisfying ego and curiosity at the same time, with babies riding horses, splashing in boats, and cavorting through whimsical adventures. School Library Journal contributor Marie Orlando called it a "charming addition to the Mother Goose canon." Bathtub Blues again returns to the world of babies and their playtime. Ten babies playing outside get dirty from the dirt, sand, and muddy puddles. Reminded that they need a bath after each delightfully dirty activity, they scamper and avoid the bath. When the inevitable need for diaper changing comes, the babies are plunked into the soapy water despite their protests. In response, they start singing "The Baby Bathtub Blues," with musical accompaniment on handy toys and jangling tambourines. The squeaky-clean infants protest again when bathtime is over, but shortly toddle outside to start the whole process over again. "Children will respond to this romp" and identify with the babies, noted School Library Journal critic Martha Topol.

Another group of the McMullan's books revolve around several familiar machines and vehicles, this time with human characteristics and personalities. I Stink! follows a cheerful, rough-and-tumble garbage truck through the streets of New York as it chomps, chews, and burps its way along its route. The book "grew out of the fact that I had become obsessed with the truck that picks up our garbage in Manhattan—mainly because it kept waking me up early," McMullan related in an interview with Sally Lodge in Publishers Weekly. "So one day I decided to go down and see just how it makes all its noise and for the first time saw how the truck really works—mashing up huge bags and carting them away." Similarly, I'm Mighty! chronicles a day in the life of a tenacious tugboat as the small but powerful craft helps nudge, guide, and park oil tankers, cargo ships, and stately passenger cruisers, none of which could safely navigate the harbor by themselves. Because the big boats need help from the little one, instead of the opposite, the book presents an "appealing nautical version of every preschooler's dream," noted Carolyn Phelan in Booklist. A Publishers Weekly contributor observed that "this tale introduces an equally likable and enthusiastic voice" as the garbage truck in I Stink!.

Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends introduces the mouse (Wagner) and rabbit (Pearl) duo whose gentle adventures help teach beginning readers important lessons about friendship, responsibility, and social interaction. With the school science fair approaching, Pearl is busy building her (cardboard) robot, but Wagner is dragging his feet and making little progress. When crunch time finally comes and Wagner has no project to display, Pearl saves him by offering to share the credit for her robot. Later, Pearl's feelings are hurt when Wagner criticizes her new green boots. In the end, Wagner apologizes, and the two remain best of friends. "McMullan's realistic portrayal of classroom friendship and activities will appeal to beginning readers as well as to older children polishing their skills," commented Laura Scott in School Library Journal. McMullan "moves the story forward with simple, authentic dialogue," noted a Publishers Weekly contributor. Gillian Engberg, writing in Booklist, remarked that the story "tackles tough friendship issues with accuracy and sunny outcomes." The affable mouse and rabbit return in Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets. Pearl's preoccupation with guessing Wagner's secret, and his equal preoccupation with not telling, ruins a field trip to an ice cream factory for the two friends. The "secret" birthday party turns out to not be a secret at all, both friends know that it will be held at an amusement park. But Wagner still harbors one secret—he is afraid of roller coasters. Pearl helps Wagner overcome this secret fear and later he helps her get past an unexpected case of nervousness. The story "addresses common concerns for children who are progressing through the stages of early reading," stated Anne Knickerbocker in School Library Journal. "Many children will recognize their own struggles and fears" in McMullan's triumphant story, stated Carolyn Phelan in Booklist.

With a nod to history, and to one of her own ancestors, McMullan's My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, recreates the journal of her many-times-great uncle Shannon, who participated in the storied Lewis and Clark expedition when he was a teenager. "Working with very few facts, McMullan has written the journal Shannon might have recorded," commented Booklist reviewer Linda Perkins. Shannon introduces all the main characters from history and gives a detailed sense of the personalities, hardships, and drive to discover new territories that the expedition embodied. "McMullan lets Shannon show his own self-discovery as he matures both physically and intellectually and gains competence as a wilderness man," remarked Betty Carter in Horn Book Magazine. McMullan once read a book about the expedition, but did not discover much about her ancestor in the account. "Passages about him more often than not referred to the fact that he had become lost, or had tipped his canoe—he seemed to mess up at every possible opportunity," McMullan related to Lodge. "I liked him for this and wanted to know more about him. And it also occurred to me that kids would easily relate to his mishaps." A Kirkus Reviews contributor commented that "the friendly voice recreated in this fictional journal will make readers happy to join him on the journey west."

McMullan once told CA: "Many of my warmest memories of childhood are of my mother reading aloud to me. As a sixth-grade teacher in the early 1970s, I rediscovered the pleasure of children's books—this time as a reader—and left teaching to study children's literature at Ohio State University. After graduating with a master's degree, I went back to teaching, reading aloud—and writing.

"As a quick glance at my book titles will indicate, humor has been a large part of my writing, especially the work I do with my partner, Lisa Eisenberg. We very much enjoy visiting schools and swapping riddles with first, second, and third graders. Our series of easy-to-read riddle books is popular with kids, as well as librarians and teachers, because the controlled vocabulary makes the books accessible to beginning readers, and the punch lines provide good motivation for reading.

"I have begun writing middle-grade novels based on my childhood experiences in the Midwest and my years as a teacher. The books deal with issues that many ten-and eleven-year-olds have to deal with, such as up-and-down friendships and the pleasures and pains of growing up. I find that, in writing these books, I am drawn back to the books I encountered when I was in fifth or sixth grade—A Tale of Two Cities or The Adventures of Tom Sawyer—and I enjoy weaving aspects of these books into my own stories. I believe that the pleasure I have derived from reading good books has been my main motivation for wanting to write them myself."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, May 1, 1996, Ilene Cooper, review of If You Were My Bunny, p. 1512; January 1, 1997, Susan Dove Lempke, review of Noel the First, p. 870; December 1, 1997, John Peters, review of Dragon Slayer's Academy: The New Kid at School, p. 637; February 15, 2000, Ellen Mandel, review of Papa's Song, p. 1118; January 1, 2003, review of I Stink!, p. 799; July, 2003, Gillian Engberg, review of Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, p. 1899; November 1, 2003, Carolyn Phelan, review of I'm Mighty!, p. 504; March 1, 2004, Ilene Cooper, review of Piggy Riddles, p. 1191; May 15, 2004, Carolyn Phelan, review of Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, p. 1626; October 15, 2004, Linda Perkins, review of My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, p. 398.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, July, 1996, Amy E. Brandt, review of If You Were My Bunny, pp. 379-380.

Horn Book Magazine, July-August, 1996, Hanna B. Zeiger, review of If You Were My Bunny, p. 451; May, 1998, Maeve Visser Knoth, review of No No, Jo!, p. 275; March, 2000, review of Papa's Song, p. 189; November-December, 2003, Christine M. Heppermann, review of I'm Mighty!, p. 731; September-October, 2004, Martha V. Parravano, review of Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, p. 593; November-December, 2004, Betty Carter, review of My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, p. 712.

Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 1996, review of If You Were My Bunny, p. 71; August 1, 2003, review of Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, p. 1020; September 15, 2003, review of I'm Mighty!, p. 1178; May 1, 2004, review of Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, p. 445; July 1, 2004, review of My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, p. 633; October 15, 2004, review of Baby Goose, p. 1010.

Publishers Weekly, October 7, 1996, review of Noel the First, p. 73; October 6, 1997, review of Dragon Slayer's Academy: The New Kid at School, p. 84; April 10, 2000, review of Papa's Song, p. 97; February 18, 2002, review of I Stink!, p. 95; September 15, 2003, review of Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, p. 64; October 20, 2003, review of I'm Mighty!, p. 53, and Sally Lodge, interview with Kate and Jim McMullan, p. 54; October 25, 2004, Sally Lodge, "On the Trail of an Ancestor," review of My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, p. 20; November 1, 2004, review of Baby Goose, p. 60; May 2, 2005, "True Companions," review of Bathtub Blues, p. 201.

School Library Journal, December, 1996, Carol Schene, review of Noel the First, p. 100; May, 1998, Virginia Golodetz, review of Dragon Slayer's Academy: The New Kid at School, p. 120; May, 1998, DeAnn Tabuchi, review of No No, Jo!, p. 121; May, 2000, Maryann H. Owen, review of Papa's Song, p. 149; May, 2002, Rita Soltan, review of As Far as I Can See: Meg's Diary, St. Louis to the Kansas Territory, 1856, p. 193; August, 2003, Kathy Piehl, review of Rock-a-Baby Band, p. 138; September, 2003, Laura Scott, review of Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, p. 184; October, 2003, review of I Stink!, p. S36; November, 2003, Susan M. Moore, review of I'm Mighty!, p. 107; January, 2004, Kristen Oravec, review of A Fine Start, p. 132; April, 2004, review of Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends, p. S28; May, 2004, Anne Knickerbocker, review of Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, p. 119; July, 2004, Deborah Rothaug, review of Piggy Riddles, p. 93; August, 2004, Sandra Kitain, review of Fluffy Plants a Jelly Bean, p. 82; September, 2004, Renee Steinberg, review of My Travels with Capts. Lewis and Clark by George Shannon, p. 212; October, 2004, review of Pearl and Wagner: Three Secrets, p. S30; November, 2004, Marie Orlando, review of Baby Goose, p. 128; June, 2005, Martha Topol, review of Bathtub Blues, p. 122.

Tribune Books (Chicago, IL), March 10, 1996, Mary Harris Veeder, review of Hey, Pipsqueak!, p. 7.

ONLINE

Kate McMullan Home Page, http://www.katemcmullan.com (October 21, 2005).

KidsReads.com Web site, http://www.kidsreads.com/ (September 5, 2005), biography of Kate McMullan.

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McMullan, Kate (Hall) 1947-

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