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Marks, Mitchell Lee 1955–

Marks, Mitchell Lee 1955–

PERSONAL: Born September 13, 1955, in Chicago, IL; son of Albert and Elaine Pearl (Lasky) Marks. Education: University of California, Santa Cruz, B.A. (with honors), 1977; University of Michigan, M.A., 1979, Ph.D., 1981. Religion: Jewish. Hobbies and other interests: Softball, gardening.

ADDRESSES: Home—263 Roosevelt Way, San Francisco, CA 94114. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: California State University, Fullerton, assistant professor of business administration, 1981–83; California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles, associate professor and director of Organizational Psychology Program, 1985–88; William M. Mercer, Inc., principal, 1988–93; Delta Consulting Group, Inc., senior director, 1993–96; self-employed management consultant and organizational psychologist, 1996–. Speaker at Harvard Business School and Smithsonian Institution.

MEMBER: American Psychological Association, Academy of Management.

AWARDS, HONORS: Mass media fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1980; Academy of Management, scholarly contribution award from Organizational Behavior Division, 1987, outstanding contribution award from Management Consultation Division, 1990.

WRITINGS:

(With Philip H. Mirvis) Managing the Merger: Making It Work, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1992.

From Turmoil to Triumph: New Life after Corporate Mergers, Acquisitions, and Downsizings, Lexington Books (Lexington, MA), 1994.

(With Philip H. Mirvis) Joining Forces: Making One Plus One Equal Three in Mergers, Acquisitions, and Alliances, Jossey-Bass (San Francisco, CA), 1998.

Charging Back up the Hill: Workplace Recovery after Mergers, Acquisitions, and Downsizings, Jossey-Bass (San Francisco, CA), 2003.

(Editor, with Kenneth P. De Meuse, and contributor) Resizing the Organization: Managing Layoffs, Divestitures, and Closings; Maximizing Gain while Minimizing Pain, Jossey-Bass (San Francisco, CA), 2003.

Contributor to books, including Building the Competitive Workforce, edited by Philip H. Mirvis, Wiley (New York, NY), 1993; Human Dilemmas in Work Organization, edited by Abraham K. Korman, Guilford (New York, NY), 1994; and Discontinuous Change: Leading Organizational Transformation, edited by David A. Nadler, Robert B. Shaw, and A. Elise Walton, Jossey-Bass (San Francisco, CA), 1995.

WORK IN PROGRESS: Research on the impact of mergers, downsizings, and other major changes on employee performance and motivation.

SIDELIGHTS: Mitchell Lee Marks once told CA: "In my work as a management consultant, I assist executives and employees in planning, implementing, and recovering from major transitions (for example, mergers, acquisitions, and downsizings). These are extremely stressful events for individuals. In the course of the work, I establish rapport with executives, who then express and vent their feelings of uncertainty and insecurity. Along with group dynamics (including culture clash) this provides colorful 'war stories' that add a human dimension to the financially-oriented business world.

"My writing provides a personal break from the intense work of management consulting. It is an opportunity to sit back, think about what has been happening with my clients, and contribute to theory and practice in organizational psychology."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, July, 1994, David Rouse, review of From Turmoil to Triumph: New Life after Mergers, Acquisitions, and Downsizing, p. 1902

HR, July 1994, review of From Turmoil to Triumph, p. 90; March, 1998, review of Joining Forces: Making One Plus One Equal Three in Mergers, Acquisitions, and Alliances, p. 129; July, 2005, review of Resizing the Organization: Managing Layoffs, Divestitures, and Closings, p. S40.

Journal of Economic Literature, September, 1998, review of Joining Forces, p. 1585.

Journal of Organizational Excellence, summer, 2004, LaRoi Lawton, review of Charging Back up the Hill: Workplace Recovery after Mergers, Acquisitions, and Downsizing, p. 107.

Library Journal, June 15, 1994, Ali D. Abdula, review of From Turmoil to Triumph, p. 79; March 15, 1995, review of From Turmoil to Triumph, p. 39.

Personnel Psychology, summer, 1995, review of From Turmoil to Triumph, p. 433; spring, 1999, review of Joining Forces, p. 194; summer, 2004, Caroline Pike, review of Charging Back up the Hill, p. 538; July, 2005, Robert Fitzpatrick, review of Resizing the Organization, p. 215.

Publishers Weekly, June 13, 1994, review of From Turmoil to Triumph, p. 57; January 5, 1998, review of Joining Forces, p. 54.

Reference and Research Book News, May, 2003, review of Charging Back up the Hill, p. 95.

Training, June, 2003, Skip Corsini, review of Charging Back up the Hill, p. 77; July-August, 2003, Jane Bozarth, review of Resizing the Organization, p. 45.

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