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Long, Pamela O.

LONG, Pamela O.

PERSONAL: Female. Education: University of Maryland, B.A. (with honors), 1965, M.A., 1969, Ph.D., 1979; Catholic University of America, M.S.W., 1971.


ADDRESSES: Home—3100 Connecticut Ave. N.W., No. 137, Washington, DC 20008. E-mail— [email protected]


CAREER: Barnard College, New York, NY, visiting assistant professor of history, 1981-82; Library of Congress, Washington, DC, copyright examiner, 1983-86; St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's City, visiting assistant professor of history, 1989-90; St. John's College, Annapolis, MD, tutor, 1991-92; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, visiting professor of history of science, 1995-98; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, senior fellow at Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology, 2000-01. Harvard University, visiting scholar in history of science, 2000-01; adjunct assistant professor at Hunter College of the City University of New York, Marymount Manhattan College, and New York University, 1982, Trinity College, Washington, DC, 1983, and University of Maryland, 1987, 1993; Washington College, Chestertown, MD, Guy F. Goodfellow History Lecturer, 1996; guest lecturer at other institutions, including Johns Hopkins University, University of Minnesota, University of California Los Angeles, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Indiana University, Max Planck Institute, and Bard College. Library of Congress, member of Scholar's Committee, 1996-99; Folger Library, seminar leader at Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, 2000; National Endowment for the Humanities, codirector of summer institute at Folger Library, 2001. Consultant for Building Big (television series), Public Broadcasting Service, 1998-99.

MEMBER: Society for the History of Technology (chair of editorial committee, 1998-99; member of executive council, 2000-02), Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science, and Art (member of board of directors of Avista Forum, 1987-2002; editor, 1987-88), Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, History of Science Society (advisory editor), Renaissance Society of America, American Historical Association.


AWARDS, HONORS: Fulbright fellow in Italy, 1979-80; junior fellow of Society for the Humanities, Cornell University, 1980-81; grants from National Science Foundation, 1987-88, 1991-92, 1998-2000, 2003-04, and National Research Council (for Germany) and Forschungsinstitut für Technik-und Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany, both 1989; Dibner Library fellowship, National Museum of American History, 1993; Abbott Payson Usher Prize, Society for the History of Technology, 1993, for article "The Openness of Knowledge: An Ideal and Its Context in Sixteenth-Century Writings on Mining and Metallurgy"; National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at Folger Shakespeare Library, 1994-95; grant for England, American Council of Learned Societies, 1996; Bernadotte E. Schmitt grant, American Historical Association, 2002, grant from Renaissance Society of American Research, 2002; Morris D. Forkosch Prize, Journal of the History of Ideas, 2002, for Openness, Secrecy, Authorship: Technical Arts and the Culture of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Renaissance; Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral Rome prize fellow, 2003-04; fellow, Davis Center for Historical Studies, Princeton University, 2004.


WRITINGS:

Technology, Society, and Culture in Late Medieval andRenaissance Europe, 1300-1600, Society for the History of Technology (Washington, DC), 2000.

Openness, Secrecy, Authorship: Technical Arts and theCulture of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Renaissance, Johns Hopkins University Press (Baltimore, MD), 2001.

Technology and Society in the Medieval Centuries:Byzantium, Islam, and the West, 500-1300, Society for the History of Technology (Washington, DC), 2003.


Editor (with Alan Stahl) of facsimile edition of a fifteenth-century commonplace book by Michael of Rhodes, Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA). Contributor to books, including Renaissance Humanism: Its Sources, Forms, and Legacy, edited by A. Rabil, Jr., University of Pennsylvania Press (Philadelphia, PA), 1988; The Architecture of Science, edited by Peter Galison and Emily Thompson, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 1999; Merchants and Marvels: Commerce, Science, and Art in Early Modern Europe, edited by Pamela H. Smith and Paula Findlen, Routledge (New York, NY), 2001; and Picturing Machines, 1400-1650, edited by Wolfgang Lefèvre, Kluwer (Dordrecht, Netherlands). Editor (with Robert C. Post) of pamphlet series "Historical Perspectives on Technology, Society, and Culture," Society for the History of Technology (Washington, DC), 2000—. Contributor of articles and reviews to periodicals, including Technology and Culture, Isis, History and Technology, Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and Renaissance Quarterly. Editor of special issue, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1985; member of editorial advisory board, Technology and Culture, 1992—; advisory editor, Isis, 1997-99; advisory editor, Osiris, 2004—; advisory editor, Oxford Medieval Dictionary.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Historical Review, February, 2003, Kevin Dunn, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship: Technical Arts and the Culture of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Renaissance, pp. 243-244.

History: Review of Books, summer, 2002, Elmer L. Clark, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, p. 170.

Journal of Interdisciplinary History, summer, 2003, Michael John Gorman, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 66-68.

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, spring, 2004, Steven A. Walton, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 310-312.

Renaissance Quarterly, winter, 2003, Beverly Sauer, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 1273-1275.

Sixteenth Century Journal, 2003, Scott Lightsey, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 1198-1200.

Speculum, April, 2004, Ann Moyer, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 515-517.

Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 2003, Peter Dear, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 821-828.

Technical Communication Quarterly, spring, 2004, Lyn F. Gattis, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 238-240.

Technology and Culture, April, 2004, Andre Wakefield, review of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, pp. 415-416.

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