Haslam, Jonathan 1951- (Jonathan George Haslam)

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Haslam, Jonathan 1951- (Jonathan George Haslam)

PERSONAL:

Born January 15, 1951, in Copthorne, England; son of E.A. and M.M.G. Haslam; married Dr. Karina Urbach, April 28, 2006. Education: Wellington, London School of Economics, B.S.; Trinity College, University of Cambridge, M.Litt. Hobbies and other interests: Travel, languages, music.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1RH, England. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, lecturer, 1975-84; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, associate professor, 1984-86; University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, King's College, senior research fellow, 1988-92, professor of history of international relations, 1992—, Corpus Christi College, fellow, 1994—. House of Lords, London, England, European Union Committee, subcommittee, specialist advisor, 2002. Visiting associate professor, Stanford University, 1986-87, University of California at Berkeley, 1987-88.

WRITINGS:

Soviet Foreign Policy, 1930-33: The Impact of the Depression, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1983.

The Soviet Union and the Struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1984.

(Editor, with Gail W. Lapidus) Reforming Socialist Systems: The Chinese and Soviet Experiences: A Conference Report, Berkeley-Stanford Program on Soviet International Behavior (Berkeley, CA), 1987.

The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 1990.

The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41: Moscow, Tokyo, and the Prelude to the Pacific War, University of Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, PA), 1992.

(Editor, with Tsuyoshi Hasegawa and Andrew Kuchins) Russia and Japan: An Unresolved Dilemma between Distant Neighbors, International and Area Studies (Berkeley, CA), 1993.

The Vices of Integrity: A Biography of E.H. Carr, Verso (London, England), 1999.

No Virtue Like Necessity: Realist Thought in International Relations since Machiavelli, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 2002.

The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile: A Case of Assisted Suicide, Verso (New York, NY), 2005.

IN RUSSIAN; COEDITOR

Rossiya I SShA: Diplomaticheskie Otnosheniya, International Democracy Foundation (Moscow, Russia), 1999.

Sovetsko-Amerikanskie Otnosheniya: Gody Nepriznaniya, 1918-1926, International DemocracyFoundation (Moscow, Russia), 2002.

Sovetsko-Amerikanskie Otnosheniya: Gody Nepriznaniya, 1927-1933, International Democracy Foundation (Moscow, Russia), 2002.

SIDELIGHTS:

Writer and educator Jonathan Haslam was born on January 15, 1951, in Copthorne, England. He received a bachelor of science degree from Wellington, London School of Economics, and a master of literature degree from Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Over the course of his career, he has served on the faculty of a number of institutions, including the University of Birmingham, Johns Hopkins University, Stanford University, the University of California at Berkeley, and King's College, University of Cambridge. Since 1992, he has served as professor of the history of international relations at the University of Cambridge, becoming a fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1994. In 2002, he served as a special advisor to the European Union Committee, subcommittee of the House of Lords. His primary areas of research and academic interest include the history of political and economic thought and policies in international relations, with a particular focus on the Soviet Union, the regime under Joseph Stalin, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of a number of books about the Soviet Union, as well as several works addressing U.S. foreign policy and socialist systems around the world, including Soviet Foreign Policy, 1930-33: The Impact of the Depression, The Soviet Union and the Struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41: Moscow, Tokyo, and the Prelude to the Pacific War, No Virtue Like Necessity: Realist Thought in International Relations since Machiavelli, and The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile: A Case of Assisted Suicide. Haslam also served as editor of Russia and Japan: An Unresolved Dilemma between Distant Neighbors, with Tsuyoshi Hasegawa and Andrew Kuchins, and Reforming Socialist Systems: The Chinese and Soviet Experiences: A Conference Report, with Gail W. Lapidus.

The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41, which addresses the foreign policies of the Soviet Union during this time period, provides readers with a broader understanding than just policies pertaining to its interactions with China. As in earlier works, Haslam illustrates how Soviet foreign policy combined aspects of the national instinct to create new and revolutionary methods of dealing with the outside world with more classical political methods. He also analyzes the back-and-forth nature of the relationship between Russia and Japan, where each of the countries took their turn in threatening the other with its military prowess, leading to an increase in armaments by both parties and an ultimately decided advantage on the part of the Soviet Union. This scenario was particularly important prior to World War II, when the Soviets initially sided with Nazi Germany and agreed to the Nazi-Soviet Pact in 1939. A shift in alliances occurred two years later, when Germany and the Soviet Union struggled to avoid a two-front war by agreeing to neutrality with Japan—another result of their undeniable military superiority. Although Haslam was unable to access various materials from Soviet archives regarding this time period or many original materials from either China or Japan, he delved deeply into both secondary source material and various Western diplomatic records in his research for The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41. Roy Allison, in a review for the English Historical Review, concluded that "the result is certainly the most meticulous study of the subject."

The Vices of Integrity: A Biography of E.H. Carr relates the life of twentieth-century British historian Edward Hallett Carr. Haslam uses Carr's life as a way to set the stage for both the time period he lived in and the history he chronicled. Carr was the child of a middle-class Victorian family, who served in the foreign office after graduating from the University of Cambridge with honors in 1916, as a previous illness made him unfit for actual combat during World War I. He spent twenty years in foreign service, a position that made him a witness to rapid changes in the Russian political scene, from the Revolution to the birth of the Soviet Union. Despite not knowing the Russian language, Carr was included in the Paris Peace Conference with the understanding that he was the closest the foreign service had to an expert on Russia. He later served the foreign office from the Riga, Latvia, bureau. He continued to study Russia independently when his career took a different direction, and he wrote a number of books on the nation's political development and the dawning of communism. Terence Emmons, in a review for the National Interest, commented that "Haslam tells, in as much detail as his elusive subject permits, the story of Carr's personal life." Emmons concluded, "It is a pathetic, but very human story, humanely told, and the more obvious connections between the intellectual and affective sides of Carr's life are spelled out without resort to psychohistorical speculation."

No Virtue Like Necessity provides readers with a broad overview of how realist thought has developed and become a part of international relations over the course of history. According to Haslam, though, the concept itself originated in classical times; the Renaissance marked a real adherence to and increase in this method of contemplation. He reviews the past several centuries, highlighting examples as he works toward modern day. Paul C. Helmreich, a contributor to History: Review of New Books, dubbed Haslam's effort "an important starting point in its thoughtful and literate survey of the development of realist principles and thought."

In The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, Haslam addresses the reasons behind the failure of Chilean president Salvador Allende, exploring a wealth of previously unexplored source materials that analyze both Allende's government and his fall from power. Rather than looking only at the political situation in Chile during the Allende regime, Haslam broadens his scope, addressing the political situation in Chile compared to the larger arena of international politics, and juxtaposing the events in Chile with those taking place in other nations, particularly Europe, the United States, Cuba, and the Soviet Union. As a result, he pinpoints a number of external factors that led to Allende's downfall, including the role of the United States in sabotaging his administration, while still noting false steps that were made within the Chilean government. Margaret Power, in a review for the Historian, concluded that "this book offers an engrossing account and a sophisticated analysis of the internal failures of the Allende government and the measures taken by the U.S. government to exploit these weaknesses and remove it from power."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Historical Review, October 1, 1985, Marilynn Giroux Hitchens, review of The Soviet Union and the Struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, p. 985; December 1, 1993, Jonathan Adelman, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41: Moscow, Tokyo, and the Prelude to the Pacific War, p. 1649; October 1, 2000, Stewart Weaver, review of The Vices of Integrity: A Biography of E.H. Carr, p. 1396.

American Political Science Review, September 1, 1991, Wolfram F. Hanrieder, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 1073.

American Spectator, March 1, 2006, James R. Whelan, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile: A Case of Assisted Suicide, p. 70.

Biography, March 22, 2007, Frederick M. Nunn, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 242.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, April 1, 1993, D. MacKenzie, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41, p. 1368; January 1, 2000, W.T. Walker, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 1001; December 1, 2002, S. Waalkes, review of No Virtue Like Necessity: Realist Thought in International Relations since Machiavelli, p. 705; January 1, 2006, C.W. Arnade, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 930.

English Historical Review, November 1, 1995, Roy Allison, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, p. 1332.

Europe-Asia Studies, December 1, 2000, David Wedgwood Benn, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 1561.

Foreign Affairs, March 22, 1985, John C. Campbell, review of The Soviet Union and the Struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, p. 924; April 1, 1985, review of The Soviet Union and the Struggle for Collective Security in Europe, 1933-39, p. 924; January 1, 1990, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 179; September 22, 1990, Gregory F. Treverton, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 179; September 1, 1993, Robert Legvold, review of Russia and Japan: An Unresolved Dilemma between Distant Neighbors; November 1, 1993, Donald Zagoria, review of Russia and Japan.

Hispanic American Historical Review, February 1, 2008, Volker Frank, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 161.

Historian, March 22, 2007, Margaret Power, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 117.

History: Review of New Books, September 22, 2002, Paul C. Helmreich, review of No Virtue Like Necessity, p. 44.

History: The Journal of the Historical Association, January 1, 2001, Edward Acton, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 67.

History Today, March 1, 1985, Paul Dukes, review of Soviet Foreign Policy, 1930-33: The Impact of the Depression, p. 52; January 1, 2000, Shaun Noble, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 56.

International Affairs, April 1, 1990, Ken Booth, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 362; March 1, 2003, Ian Harris, review of No Virtue Like Necessity, p. 413; January 1, 2006, Alan Angell, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 225.

International History Review, August 1, 1992, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 648; August 1, 1993, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41, p. 608; December 1, 2000, David R. Marples, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 928.

Journal of Modern History, February 1, 2001, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 931; December 1, 2001, Lars T. Lih, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 931.

Library Journal, August 1, 1992, Thomas G. Anton, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, 1933-41, p. 125.

National Interest, March 22, 2000, Terence Emmons, "Unreal Realism," review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 137.

New Statesman, November 8, 1999, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 54.

Pacific Historical Review, November 1, 2006, Frederick M. Nunn, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile, p. 691.

Reference & Research Book News, November 1, 2005, review of The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende's Chile.

Russian Review, July 1, 1991, George E. Hudson, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe, 1969-87, p. 376; October 1, 1994, Jiri Hochman, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East, p. 590; July 1, 2000, "E.H. Carr," review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 442.

Slavonic and East European Review, July 1, 1991, Christoph Bluth, review of The Soviet Union and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons in Europe: 1969-87, p. 589; July 1, 1993, Robert F. Miller, review of The Soviet Union and the Threat from the East: 1993-41, p. 561.

Spectator, September 4, 1999, Norman Stone, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 34; November 20, 1999, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 47.

Times Higher Education Supplement (London, England), November 26, 1999, Jonathan Erickson, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 28.

Times Literary Supplement (London, England), September 10, 1999, Richard Pipes, review of The Vices of Integrity, p. 3.

Virginia Quarterly Review, January 1, 2003, review of No Virtue Like Necessity, p. 24.

ONLINE

H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Online,http://www.h-net.org/ (August 20, 2008), Henry Reichman, review of The Vices of Integrity.

International Socialism Journal Online,http://pubs.socialistreviewindex.org.uk/ (August 20, 2008), Bruce Manning, "History and Socialism," review of The Vices of Integrity.

University of Cambridge Web site,http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/ (August 20, 2008), faculty profile.