Fine, Sidney 1920-

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FINE, Sidney 1920-

PERSONAL: Born October 11, 1920, in Cleveland, OH; son of Morris Louis (a teacher) and Gussie (Redalia) Fine; married Jean Schechter, December 5, 1942; children: Gail Judith, Deborah Ann. Education: Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve University), B.A. (summa cum laude), 1942; University of Michigan, M.A., 1944, Ph.D., 1948. Religion: Jewish. Hobbies and other interests: Opera, sports.

ADDRESSES: Home—825 Russett Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Office—Department of History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. E-mail—[email protected] umich.edu.

CAREER: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, instructor, 1948-51, assistant professor, 1951-55, associate professor, 1955-59, professor of history, 1959-74, Andrew Dickson White Professor of History, 1974-2001, professor emeritus. Member of faculty, Salzburg Seminar in American Studies, Austria, 1959. Military service: U.S. Naval Reserve, 1942-46, became lieutenant junior grade.

MEMBER: American Historical Association, Organization of American Historians, Labor Historians (president, 1969-71), American Association of University Professors, University of Michigan Scientific Club, University of Michigan Research Club, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi.

AWARDS, HONORS: Rackham predoctoral fellow, 1946-48; Guggenheim fellow, 1957-58; University of Michigan Press award, and Association of State and Local History award of merit, both 1964, both for Automobile under the Blue Eagle: Labor, Management, and the Automobile Manufacturing Code; Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, University of Michigan, 1969; Historical Society of Michigan award of merit, 1970, 1989, 2000; University of Michigan Press book award, 1971, for Sit-Down; University of Michigan Press award, 1985, for Frank Murphy: The Washington Years; named Professor of the Year, State of Michigan, 1986; Gustavus Myers Center Human Rights award, 1900, and University of Michigan Press award, 1991, both for Violence in the Model City: The Cavanagh Administration, Race Relations, and the

Detroit Riot of 1967; Golden Apple award, 1993; L.S. & A. Excellence in Education award, 1997; State of Michigan special tribute, 1997; Spirit of Michigan award, 1999, named International Man of the Year, International Biographical Centre, 2000; Frank Murphy: The Detroit Years named most significant monograph in the field of Michigan history, 2000. Honorary degrees from Wittenberg University, DePauw University, and University of Massachusetts-Boston.

WRITINGS:

Laissez Faire and the General-Welfare State, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1956.

(With Gerald Brown) The American Past, two volumes, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1961.

Recent America, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1962, 2nd edition, 1967.

The Automobile under the Blue Eagle: Labor, Management, and the Automobile Manufacturing Code, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1963.

Sit-Down, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1969.

Frank Murphy: The Detroit Years, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1975.

Frank Murphy: The New Deal Years, University of Chicago Press (Chicago, IL), 1979.

Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1984.

Violence in the Model City: The Cavanagh Administration, Race Relations, and the Detroit Riot of 1967, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1989.

Without Blare of Trumpets: Walter Drew, the National Erectors' Association, and the Open Shop Movement, 1903-57, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1995.

Civil Rights and the Michigan Constitution of 1963, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI), 1996.

Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968, Wayne State University Press (Detroit, MI), 2000.

Contributor to professional journals.

SIDELIGHTS: During his fifty years as a history teacher at the University of Michigan, Sidney Fine became the longest-tenured instructor in the school's history. Throughout the decades Fine also published notable books on the political and labor history of Michigan, among them a widely praised three-volume biography of Frank Murphy. As governor of Michigan from 1937-38, Murphy made headlines when he refused to send in military troops to remove workers engaged in a sit-down strike at a Detroit auto plant. Later Murphy became U.S. attorney general and served on the U.S. Supreme Court in the post-World War II years. Fine examines Murphy's rise in influence against the development of Detroit as an industrial center during World War II in the volumes The Detroit Years, The New Deal Years, and The Washington Years, all published between 1975 and 1984. More recent events in Michigan history are analyzed by Fine in such works as Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968, which focuses on the developing struggle for racial equality as it manifested itself in legislation and political advocacy.

In Without Blare of Trumpets: Walter Drew, the National Erectors' Association, and the Open Shop Movement, 1903-57, Fine examines the contentious labor leader who defied the unions during the early twentieth century to establish "open shops," manufacturing plants open to union and nonunion workers alike. Drew, leader of the nonunion National Erectors' Association (NEA), took his campaign to the streets, trooping "from city to city, getting steel fabricators and erectors to agree to operate only on the open shop basis," noted Walter Licht in Industrial and Labor Relations Review. Licht commented that while Fine's thesis—that Drew's efforts were a key factor in the collapse of the modern American trade movement—"is not sustained," the critic also had praise for the author's work: "With its copious details on Drew, the NEA, and the responses of organized business to union campaigns, this book is an invaluable contribution to labor history scholarship, and a work to be cited."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

periodicals

American Historical Review, June, 1985, Paul Murphy, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, p. 780; February, 1991, Joe Trotter, review of Violence in the Model City: The Cavanagh Administration, Race Relations, and the Detroit Riot of 1967, p. 283; October, 1996, review of Without Blare of Trumpets: Walter Drew, the National Erectors' Association, and the Open Shop Movement, 1903-57, p. 1300; December, 2001, Stephen Grant Meyer, review of Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights: Michigan, 1948-1968, p. 1832.

American Journal of Legal History, October, 1986, Robert Harrison, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, pp. 363-366.

Benchmark, November-December, 1985, Dennis Hutchinson, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, pp. 54-55.

Catholic Historical Review, October, 1981, review of Frank Murphy: The New Deal Years, p. 647; October, 1986, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, p. 675.

Choice, October, 1995, R. M. Hyser, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 355; January, 2001, H. Shapiro, review of Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights, p. 965.

Constitutional Commentary, summer, 1985, Michael Parrish, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, pp. 463-469.

Georgia Law Review, spring, 1985, John Frank, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, pp. 777-780.

Historian, February, 1987, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, p. 282.

Industrial and Labor Relations Review, January, 1997, Walter Licht, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 362.

Journal of American Ethnic History, fall, 1991, Dominic Capeci, Jr., review of Violence in the Model City, p. 111.

Journal of American History, June, 1985, Peter Irons, review of Frank Murphy: The Washington Years, p. 185; June, 1990, Michael Honey, review of Violence in the Model City, p. 369; December, 1995, Joseph McCartin, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 1252; September, 2001, Timothy Thurber, review of Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights, p. 729.

Journal of Economic History, March, 1996, Melvyn Dubofsky, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 272.

Journal of Negro History, winter-spring, 1990, Dewey Grantham, review of Violence in the Model City, p. 43.

Journal of Urban History, August, 1981, review of Frank Murphy: The Detroit Years, p. 507.

Labor History, fall, 1995, Daniel Nelson, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 633.

Law and Social Inquiry, winter, 1988, David Danelski, review of Frank Murphy: The Detroit Years, Frank Murphy: The Washington Years and Frank Murphy: The New Deal Years, pp. 189-199.

Michigan Quarterly Review, spring, 1990, John Barnard, review of Violence in the Model City, p. 288.

Public Opinion Quarterly, winter, 1990, review of Violence in the Model City, p. 633.

Reviews in American History, March, 1990, David Colburn, review of Violence in the Model City, p. 124; March, 1996, Howell John Harris, review of Without Blare of Trumpets, p. 102.*