Skip to main content

Blonder, Ellen Leong 1950-

BLONDER, Ellen Leong 1950-


PERSONAL: Born 1950; married Nick Blonder; children: one daughter.


ADDRESSES: Home—Mill Valley, CA. Agent—c/o Author Mail, Random House, 299 Park Ave., New York, NY 10171.


CAREER: Illustrator, artist, and cookbook author.

AWARDS, HONORS: Award for best cookbook in the American category, International Association of Culinary Professionals, 1999, for Every Grain of Rice.


WRITINGS:


(With Annabel Low) Every Grain of Rice: A Taste ofOur Chinese Childhood in America, Clarkson Potter (New York, NY), 1998.

Dim Sum: The Art of the Chinese Tea Lunch, Clarkson Potter (New York, NY), 2002.



illustrator


Rita Abrams, At Your Age You're Having What?!: TheAdvantages of Mature Maternity, Whatever Pub. (Mill Valley, CA), 1983.

Maida Silverman, Bunny's ABC Box, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1986.

Maida Silverman, Piggy's Good Food: A MealtimeWord Book, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1987.

Parade Pony, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1987.

Harriet Wittels and Joan Greisman, A Bird's-Eye View:A First Book of Maps, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1995.

Wee Wonders of Nature, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1988.

My Very First Things, Grosset & Dunlap (New York, NY), 1988.

Ron Fontes and Justine Korman, The Ghost WhoCouldn't Boo, Random House (New York, NY), 1994.

The Velveteen Rabbit, Random House (New York, NY), 1995.

Todd Karr, Backyard Magic: Be a Magician! UseThings You Find in Your Own Backyard! Demco Media, 1996.

Kay Anne Carson, For Mother with Love, C. R. Gibson Co., 2000.


SIDELIGHTS: Ellen Leong Blonder has been a professional illustrator and designer for more than two decades. Her artwork focusing on plants and gardens has been in great demand for licensing by companies who use it on various products, including stationary, dinnerware, and textiles. She has also illustrated numerous children's books.

Blonder authored her first book with her aunt, Annabel Low, whose father owned the Honk Kong Café in Sacramento, California. The two women are only sixteen days apart in age and grew up more like sisters than as aunt and niece. In their book Every Grain of Rice: A Taste of Our Chinese Childhood in America, Blonder and Low present more than 120 recipes, many of which they remember from their childhood. These recipes include Chinese dishes, which use exotic vegetables, and are rarely found in other cookbooks. In addition to exotic recipes such as Green Loofah Squash with Prawns and Chinese New Year's Cake, the cookbook includes traditional Chinese-American foods. "Just reading about these delights makes one want to rush into the kitchen and break out the wok," wrote Mary Knoblauch in a review in Booklist. Also illustrated by Blonder, Every Grain of Rice features anecdotes by both authors that provide a look into their family lives as children. Calling the anecdotes "personal without being too sentimental," a Publishers Weekly reviewer also noted, "This book is both appetizing and engaging."

Blonder's second book Dim Sum: The Art of Chinese Lunch focuses on the making of dim sums, which are the mainstay of the tradition Chinese tea lunch. Using clear explanations and her own illustrations, Blonder explains how to prepare such dim sum mainstays as Pork and Shrimp Siu Mai and Chinese Chive Dumplings. In addition, Blonder discusses dim sum restaurants, various Chinese teas, and how to set up a steamer and make doughs. Overall, the book contains eighty recipes, including breads, sweets, and condiments. Judith Sutton, writing in the Library Journal, noted that the "recipes are clearly written" and include "step-by-step drawings of various techniques."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:


periodicals


Booklist, May 15, 1998, Mark Knoblauch, review of Every Grain of Rice: A Taste of Our Chinese Childhood in America, p. 1579.

Library Journal, February 15, 1998, John Charles, review of Every Grain of Rice, p. 166; March 15, 2002, Judith Sutton, review of Dim Sum: The Art of the Chinese Tea Lunch, p. 103.

Publishers Weekly, April 20, 1998, review of EveryGrain of Rice, p. 61.

School Library Journal, September, 1987, Karen Litton, review of Bunny's ABC Box, p. 170.*

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Blonder, Ellen Leong 1950-." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Blonder, Ellen Leong 1950-." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 18, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/blonder-ellen-leong-1950

"Blonder, Ellen Leong 1950-." Contemporary Authors. . Retrieved November 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/blonder-ellen-leong-1950

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.