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Bishop, Kay 1942-

BISHOP, Kay 1942-
(Genevieve K. Bishop)

PERSONAL:

Born June 16, 1942, in Grand Forks, ND; daughter of Arnold F. (an educator and journalist) and Louise (a teacher) Cecka; married James E. Bishop, 1966 (divorced, 1989); children: James Christopher, Jennifer Kay Bishop Cahall, Lara Gail Bishop Oerter. Ethnicity: "Norwegian-Czech—Caucasian." Education: Manatee Junior College, A.A. (summa cum laude), 1962; Florida State University, B.A. (magna cum laude), 1963, Ph.D., 1992; Washington State University, M.Ed., 1979; University of South Florida, M.A., 1984. Politics: Democrat. Religion: Protestant. Hobbies and other interests: Reading, water aerobics.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Williamsville, NY. Office—Department of Library and Information Studies, 534 Baldy Hall, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1020. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER:

U.S. Peace Corps, Washington, DC, volunteer English and science teacher in Dhulikhel, Nepal, 1963-65; high school English teacher in Sarasota, FL, 1965-66; junior high school English teacher in Bradenton, FL, 1966-67; school media specialist in Manatee County, FL, 1970-71; school media specialist and director of academically talented program at a Christian school in Bradenton, 1974-84; high school media specialist in Palmetto, FL, 1984-92; school media specialist at elementary school in Hanau, Germany, 1992-93; librarian at American school in Montagnola-Lugano, Switzerland, 1993-94; Murray State University, Murray, KY, assistant professor of education, 1994-95; University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, assistant professor of library and information science, 1995-97; University of Kentucky, Lexington, assistant professor of library and information science, 1997-99; University of South Florida, Tampa, associate professor of library and information science, 1999-2002; State University of New York at Buffalo, associate professor and director of School Library Media Specialist Program, 2002—. Manatee County Adult and Vocational Education Center, teacher of English and English as a second language, 1974-76; University of South Florida, part-time reference librarian, 1988-90; conference presenter; guest on local media programs. University of Southern Mississippi, chair of Children's Book Festival Medallion Committee, 1997-2000; Amherst Public Library, member of Friends of the Library, 2002—.

MEMBER:

International Association of School Librarianship, American Library Association, Association for Library and Information Science Education, Association for Library Service to Children, American Association of School Librarians (and Educators of Library Media Specialists Section), Young Adult Library Services Association, New York Library Association, School Librarians' Association of Western New York, University of South Florida Alumni Association, Beta Phi Mu, Phi Kappa Phi, Friends of Nepal, Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

WRITINGS:

(With Jean Donham, Carol Kuhlthau, and Dianne Oberg) Inquiry-Based Learning: Lessons from Library Power, Linworth Publishing (Worthington, OH), 2001.

(With Phyllis Van Orden) The Collection Program in Schools: Concepts, Practices, and Information Sources, 3rd edition, Libraries Unlimited (Englewood, CO), 2001, 4th edition (sole author), 2006.

Connecting Libraries with Classrooms: The Curricular Roles of the Media Specialist, Linworth Publishing (Worthington, OH), 2003.

(With Sue Janczak) A Staff Development Guide to Workshops for Technology and Information Literacy: Ready to Present!, Linworth Publishing (Worthington, OH), 2005.

Contributor to books, including Ethics in School Librarianship, Linworth Publishing (Worthington, OH), 2003. Contributor of articles and reviews to periodicals, including Young Adult Library Services, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Knowledge Quest, Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, Gifted Child Quarterly, Library Resources and Technical Services, Library Quarterly, Library Media Connection, Social Studies and the Young Learner, and Teacher Librarian. Guest editor, Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, spring, 2002. Member of editorial board, Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, 2001-02.

SIDELIGHTS:

Kay Bishop told CA: "My first book was written in collaboration with Dr. Phyllis Van Orden, one of my academic professors at Florida State University and a wonderful mentor for me through the years. During this collaboration I learned much about book publishing and collaborative authorship, both of which I later utilized when writing additional books.

"While teaching in library science departments in university settings I began to feel strongly about some topics and ideas that I wanted to see introduced to school library media specialists. For instance, in my book Connecting Libraries with Classrooms: The Curricular Roles of the Media Specialist, my intent was to write a book that took an in-depth look at some of the K-12 curricula, special groups of students, and educational trends with which a media specialist should become acquainted. I examined other books on the same topic and found them to be very broad in scope. Although they may have covered more topics, depth was lacking. I preferred to establish a model that readers can use to thoroughly examine the numerous topics that affect the K-12 curriculum, and also to encourage media specialists to think about ways that media center programs can lend valuable support to the curriculum. The book A Staff Development Guide to Workshops for Technology and Information Literacy: Ready to Present!, which was coauthored with my program assistant Sue Janczak, was written for a similar reason—to provide some comprehensive examples of staff development workshops, while at the same time to supply a model that school media specialists (or teachers) can utilize to conduct effective workshops on additional topics not covered in the book. Including with this book a CD-ROM that can be customized makes it possible for media specialists to add or change information and to utilize their own creative skills. Thus, I would have to say that the primary motivation for my writing has been, not only to impart information, but also to inspire readers to inquire and create independently, which undoubtedly is the major premise of my educational philosophy."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, June 1, 2002, Ann Welton, review of The Collection Program in Schools: Concepts, Practices, and Information Sources, 3rd edition, p. 1780; March 1, 2004, Lesley Farmer, review of Connecting Libraries with Classrooms: The Curricular Roles of the Media Specialist, p. 1230.

Book Report, May-June, 2002, Leslie Greaves, review of The Collection Program in Schools, p. 71.

School Library Journal, May, 2004, Beth Jones, review of Connecting Libraries with Classrooms, p. 180.

ONLINE

Dr. Kay Bishop Home Page,http://www.sis.buffalo.edu/faculty/bishop (February 16, 2006).

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