Bishop, Claire Huchet (1898–1993)

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Bishop, Claire Huchet (1898–1993)

French-American author and political activist. Born Claire Huchet, Dec 30, 1898, in Brittany, France, or Geneva, Switzerland; became a US citizen; died Mar 11, 1993, in Paris; attended the Sorbonne; married Frank Bishop (pianist).

Was instrumental in opening the 1st French children's library, L'Heure Joyeuse, following WWI; married and came to US; joined staff of New York Public Library, where she became a popular storyteller; wrote The Five Chinese Brothers, a modern classic; also wrote The Man Who Lost His Head, Pancakes-Paris (runner-up for Newbery Medal, 1948), Twenty and Ten, All Alone, A Present from Petros and Yeshu, Called Jesus; was actively involved as a lecturer and writer for various social movements in France; served as president of Jewish Christian Fellowship of France (1968–81) and International Council of Christians and Jews (1975–77).